SWEETS FOR THE LADIES. CIGARS FOR THE GENTLEMEN.


ALBERT FIGDOR IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE LAST PRIVATE ART COLLECTORS OF OLD. IN THE JUNE AUCTION, NEUMEISTER IS AUCTIONING 21 OBJECTS FROM THE VIENNESE GRAND SEIGNEUR'S LEGENDARY COLLECTION.

From Dr. Helga Puhlmann

 

 

 

PRIVATEER AT THE AGE OF 33.

Albert Figdor (May 16, 1843 - February 22, 1927) came from a Jewish family of entrepreneurs with Hungarian roots. His ancestors settled in Vienna at the end of the 18th century as wool merchants and ran their international business from there. They were so successful that after a few years they became part of the city's upper class and moved in the highest circles. Albert began collecting sculptures, furniture and small art objects as a young man. He studied law in Vienna, obtained a doctorate and then joined his family's banking business, where he was involved in financing the construction of the Gotthard Railway, among other things. In 1876, his father, the entrepreneur and banker Ferdinand Joachim Figdor (born 1805), died and bequeathed a large fortune to his three children. At the age of just 33, Albert was able to give up his job at the bank to devote himself entirely to his passion for collecting. 

A GRACIOUS HOST

Various authors have reported in their writings on visits to Albert Figdor, including famous art historians such as the Berlin museum man Wilhelm von Bode or Gustav Glück and Ernst Buschbeck, both of whom later became directors of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. They describe him as an educated, interested and humorous conversationalist who enjoyed showing his colleagues his treasures and sharing his knowledge with them. He seems to have been an elegantly dressed grand seigneur, an amiable and approachable host who kept fine sweets in stock for the ladies and the most expensive cigars for the gentlemen. What an enviable daily routine: Albert Figdor used to spend the morning and afternoon "organizing the collection (...) and receiving frequent visitors and not least the small agents" 1, while in the afternoon he viewed the new arrivals from the Viennese antique and art dealers. For variety, Figdor traveled all over Europe to track down interesting objects himself. He was also in contact with numerous dealers at home and abroad, who made him offers to add to his art collection.

12 ROOMS. STACKED FULL OF ART.

In 1879, following the death of his uncle Gustav, his father's brother, Albert came into possession of the five-storey Figdor City Palace at Löwelstrasse 8 in Vienna, built by the architect Viktor Rumpelmayer. Figdor moved into a 12-room apartment on the third floor, which he completely furnished with objects from his collection. He did not follow any particular system and did not arrange the pieces according to materials, content or chronology, but arranged everything according to his personal taste. 

12 ROOMS. STACKED FULL OF ART.

In 1879, following the death of his uncle Gustav, his father's brother, Albert came into possession of the five-storey Figdor City Palace at Löwelstrasse 8 in Vienna, built by the architect Viktor Rumpelmayer. Figdor moved into a 12-room apartment on the third floor, which he completely furnished with objects from his collection. He did not follow any particular system and did not arrange the pieces according to materials, content or chronology, but arranged everything according to his personal taste. 

 

EUROPE'S LARGEST PRIVATE COLLECTION.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Albert Figdor's art collection was considered the largest private collection in Europe. It included paintings, miniatures, sculptures, ivory carvings, tapestries, clocks, gold and silversmith's work from altars to jewelry as well as relics and around 300 pieces of furniture of all kinds. As Figdor had a particular fondness for objects of domestic and craft use, chandeliers, stoves, metal vessels, tiles, faience, stoneware, glassware, games, toys, medals, textiles, tools and many other groups of objects were added, demonstrating the broad spectrum of their respective genres. The actual size of the encyclopedic collection seems never to have been determined in terms of numbers; it was estimated at 5,000 to 6,000 artifacts. 

 

Albert Figdors Wiener Wohnung glich einem Museum. Über dem Schreibtisch ist die Heilige Sippe zu erkennen (Lot 126).

WORKS OF ART AS LIVING WITNESSES TO HISTORY

The selection of works of art from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance corresponded to the taste of the second half of the 19th century, which was particularly characterized by an interest in past "styles" and cultural-historical contexts. As authentic historical testimonies, Figdor used the individual objects to illustrate life in earlier times. He selected the pieces for his collection with an exceptional sense of quality and placed the highest demands on the artistic design, execution and state of preservation of the objects he acquired. The paintings and sculptures included some outstanding works of art, such as the "Prodigal Son" by Hieronymus Bosch, the "Carrying of the Cross" from Lorch and two reliefs, which are now regarded as major works of Ottonian ivory sculpture. However, Figdor acquired them less as masterpieces of art than for their cultural-historical significance.

 

EVERYTHING HAS ITS ORDER

Josephine Hildebrand reports that Figdor liked to put together small arrangements according to thematic aspects. For example, he assigned "...various original leather falcon caps, a golden piece of jewelry in the finest enamel with the depiction of a falconess, a wooden falcon that may have served as a decoy during the hunt... "2 and other objects to an altarpiece by the Master of the Magdalene Legend depicting a ride to the falcon hunt. In this way, various aspects of falconry, which was a popular pastime at princely courts, especially in the Middle Ages, were illustrated in a differentiated way.

In 1891, Albert Figdor attempted to place his treasures in the care of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, but Count Trauttmansdorff, the chamberlain responsible at the time, turned down the offer of a foundation. A few years later, the collector decided to appoint his niece Margarethe Becker-Walz, who lived in Heidelberg, as universal heir. After his death in 1927, however, a difficult situation arose: Becker-Walz's efforts to take the collection out of the country in individual parts failed due to the Austrian Monument Protection Act, which stipulated that the entire collection had to be preserved. In 1928, she therefore decided to sell her inheritance to a consortium initiated by the Viennese art dealer Gustav Nebehay. In return for donating some of the objects to the Republic of Austria (now the Kunsthistorisches Museum and Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna), permission to export the rest was negotiated. The works of art were then cataloged in five large-format volumes by eminent art historians and auctioned off by the auction houses Artaria and Glückselig in Vienna from 11 to 13 June 1930. A second auction on September 29 and 30, 1930 at Paul Cassirer in Berlin finally sealed the end of what was probably the most important and original private collection of its time.

Many of the art treasures once acquired by Albert Figdor can now be found in important museums around the world. It is a particular stroke of luck for NEUMEISTER to now be able to offer 21 privately owned pieces from this important collection. The objects were acquired by Figdor's descendants in 1930 and have remained in the possession of the collector's family to this day. At the June auction, a particularly exciting chapter of art history will now be presented.

 

FRANZ VON LENBACH
1836 Schrobenhausen – 1904 München

ALBERT FIGDOR

Öl auf Karton. 56,5 × 49 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 131
SCHÄTZPREIS € 3.000-4.000

 


Literaturhinweise 1 Gustav Glück, Dr. Albert Figdor und seine Sammlung. In: Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst, 1928, Jg. 61, S. 252) 2 Josephine Hildebrand, Albert Figdor, Wien (1843 – 1927) Sammler aus Berufung. In: Julius-Lessing-Gesellschaft (Hg.), Glück, Leidenschaft und Verantwortung. Das Kunstgewerbemuseum und seine Sammler, Ausst.-Kat. Berlin 1996, S. 27 – 31 3 Ernst Buschbeck in „Belvedere. Monatsschrift für Sammler und Kunstfreude“, Nr. 11, 1927, S. 3 – 5 FRANZ VON LENBACH 1836 Schrobenhausen – 1904 München 

 

 

SAKRISTEISCHRANK
BODENSEEREGION (LINDAU), UM 1457

Eiche. 128 × 213 × 50 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 119
SCHÄTZPREIS € 20.000-30.000

 


 "I COLLECT WARM THINGS"


from Dr. Bettina Schwick

"If an expert today only wanted to rank the collections of the European continent, he would place the Figdor Collection in Vienna in the very first row, even if he had not even seen it in person," enthused the art historian and later director of the Royal Bavarian National Museum Hans Stegmann in 1907 on the occasion of his detailed article on the wooden furniture in the Figdor Collection.

The furniture genre was a focal point within the collection: This is evident not only from the number (around 300) of furniture lots auctioned in Vienna in June 1930, but also from historical photographs of Figdor's Viennese living rooms, which even Stegmann could not help but describe as "stuffed full".

His collecting activities focused primarily on furniture from the late Middle Ages and the late Renaissance. In doing so, Figdor was fully in line with the tastes of the late 19th century, when references to historical styles characterized both private and institutional collections. For example, from the second half of the 19th century onwards, the Bavarian National Museum acquired mainly southern German furniture from the late Gothic period; in Berlin, Wilhelm von Bode established the collection of Italian Renaissance furniture for the Kaiser-Friedrich Museum around 1900. This was not only intended to preserve and exhibit cultural heritage, but also to stimulate contemporary craftsmanship in the sense of models.

"... that hardly any other collection is as free of forgeries as the Figdorsche," Stegmann emphasized - already aware at the time that the great demand for early furniture encouraged the production of plagiarisms and alterations. Today, the authenticity of late medieval and Renaissance furniture in museum collections is also critically scrutinized and examined in a differentiated manner with the help of modern technological examination methods. Time and again, one piece of furniture or another turns out to be a work of the 19th or early 20th century.

 

 

 

The "Innsbrucker Nachrichten" reported on the auction on June 13, 1930. It states: "The sensation of the day in the furniture auction was the Lindau sacristy cabinet from 1457, a magnificent piece, which was knocked down for 150,000 ATS after fierce competition." This very sacristy cabinet is now being auctioned by NEUMEISTER.

9th century or the early 20th century. Seating furniture dominated Figdor's collection in typological terms - the spectrum ranged from the late Gothic scissor chair to the Swiss armrest table of the 18th century (LOT 124, see pages 20 and 39). Undoubtedly the most famous of these, even today, is the so-called Strozzi-Sgabello. Albert Figdor acquired the board chair from the noble Strozzi family in Florence in the 1870s, and today the world's most published piece of seating furniture is on display in the Metropolitan Museum in New York. In terms of storage furniture, the collection mainly contains chests and a few cabinets. One of the earliest examples is the so-called Lindau sacristy cabinet (lot 119), whose inscription in relief indicates that it was donated or made by a "Dischmacher" named Ortolf in 1457. The oldest known sacristy cabinet from Wertheim in the Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe, which was once used to store liturgical vestments, is dated just eight years earlier.

 

 

 

 

 

 


KLEINE TRUHE
VENETO, 15. JH.

Zypressenholz (?). 39 × 55 × 28 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 120
SCHÄTZPREIS € 10.000 - 12.000

 

Among the six pieces of furniture from the Figdor Collection offered here, a charming, extraordinarily detailed late Gothic small chest (lot 120) is also worthy of special mention. In terms of construction and decoration, it is closely related to a group of 15th century chests that are now in museums in London or St. Petersburg and were made in the Veneto region. Their fronts are each decorated to fill the entire surface and in a symmetrical arrangement with courtly societies from the context of the Minne or - as here - sacred depictions in the technique of the so-called flat cut on a stippled ground. The lid and edges often emphasize the smallest ornaments in scroll embossing. Like their relatives, the much larger cassoni, these chests were probably made for weddings, but were not used to hold the bride's trousseau, but rather to store valuables.

"I collect warm things" - this is how Albert Figdor characterized his collection to Hans Stegmann. The furniture in the Figdor Collection radiates warmth with its historically aged surfaces; they are rare testimonies to a long-gone furnishing and living culture, as well as to the passion for collecting of one of the most important connoisseurs at the turn of the 20th century.


Literatur: – Charles, Corinne, Iconographie courtoise. Amour charnel et marriage. Les coffres du Veneto, in: L’image en questions. Pour Jean Wirth. Genf 2013, S. 183–188 – Grebe, Anja, Mikroarchitektur und Möbel – Ornament, Form, Konzept, in: Kratzke, Christine/Albrecht, Uwe, Mikroarchitektur im Mittelalter. Leipzig 2008, S. 519–533 – Koeppe, Wolfram, French and Italian renaissance furniture at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in: Apollo 139 (1994), S. 24–32 – Schubring, Paul, Cassoni: Truhen und Truhenbilder der italienischen Frührenaissance. Leipzig 1923 – Stegmann, H(ans), Die Holzmöbel der Sammlung Figdor, in: Kunst und Kunsthandwerk × (1907), S. 121–170 sowie S. 559–630

 

Die im Juni zum Aufruf kommende Truhe zierte Albert Figdors Wohnung ebenfalls (Lot 121)

 

CASSONE
OBERITALIEN, UM 1500 U. SPÄTER

Nadelholz, Nussbaum u. a. Hölzer.
53 × 184 × 65 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 121
SCHÄTZPREIS € 6.000-8.000

 

Einfach nur schön: Das kunstvolle Relief der kleinen Truhe aus dem 15. Jahrhundert.
(LOT 120)

ARMLEHNSTABELLE
NORDOSTSCHWEIZ, DAT. 1716

Nussbaum. Reliefdekor mit Volutenranken.
Lehnenbekrönung mit Wappen, Datierung „1716“ sowie Bez. „ANTONIE ZWEILER“.

AUKTION 413 // LOT 124
SCHÄTZPREIS € 1.000–1.400

 

SCHRANK
FRANKREICH, 17./19. JH.

Nussbaum, schwarz-weißer Marmor. Dekor mit Relieftafeln (Personifikationen, Schwäne, Chimären) und Marmorplaketten.
217 × 176 × 45 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 123
SCHÄTZPREIS € 6.000 – 8.000

 

 

 

 

MADONNA MIT NÄHKORB
UTRECHT, UM 1480/90

Eichenholzrelief. 30,5 × 36 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 115

SCHÄTZPREIS € 8.000-12.000

 

SEGNENDES CHRISTUSKIND
ITALIEN, 18. JH.

Holz, vollrund geschnitzt.
H. (mit Sockel) 34 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 118
SCHÄTZPREIS € 800-1.200

 

SEGNENDES CHRISTUSKIND
SÜDDEUTSCH, 1. HÄLFTE 17. JH.

Holz, vollrund geschnitzt. H. 43,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 117
SSCHÄTZPREIS € 5.000-7.000

 

 

SIEGEL DER BUCHBINDER

HEIDELBERG, DATIERT 1666

Bronze.
D. 3,3 cm H. 2,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 111
SCHÄTZPREIS € 600 - 800

 

 

SCHNABELKANNE
DEUTSCH, 14. JH.

Messing.
H. 28,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 112
SCHÄTZPREIS € 800 - 1.000

 

 

GRAPEN
DEUTSCH, ENDE 15. JH.

Bronze. H. 31 cm D. 14,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 113
SCHÄTZPREIS € 1.200 - 1.500

 

 

KÄSTCHEN
SCHWEIZ, 6. JH. UND SPÄTER

Nussbaum und Buche. 12,5 × 24 × 10,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 114
SCHÄTZPREIS € 1.400-1.600

 

TISCH
FRANKREICH, 16. JH. UND SPÄTER

Nussbaum. 73,5 × 99 × 72 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 122
SCHÄTZPREIS € 3.000 – 5.000

 

 

 

 


HL. DOROTHEA
Sog. Meister von Osnabrück

(tätig 1. Drittel 16. Jh. in Osnabrück u. Umgebung), um 1510/20

Linde, rückseitig gehöhlt,

AUKTION 413 // LOT 116
SCHÄTZPREIS € 4.000-6.000

 


TABLE JOY


  from Dr. Rainer Schuster

Jan Polack was the dominant painter of the late Gothic period in Munich. He was active as a panel painter and fresco artist. His place and year of birth are not known, but the first work that can be attributed to him is dated 1479. It is not clear whether his surname points to his origins; on the contrary, it cannot be ruled out that Polack was born in Bavaria. A unique feature of Jan Polack's art is the pronounced pathos and narrative joy of his paintings. For Polack and his colleagues, the drama of the depiction, the quick "readability" of a depiction was clearly more important than painterly brilliance and the correct drawing of the anatomies. The emotional moment is particularly important in the design of the faces, often resulting in a grimacing exaggeration of the physiognomies.

 

Jan Polack succeeded in securing almost all the major commissions during Munich's economic heyday in the decades around 1500. He produced a series of important works for the Wittelsbach dukes, beginning with three retables in the palace chapel of Blutenburg Castle, which are still in situ today. These were followed by the high altar retable for Munich's Franciscan Church (Bavarian National Museum, Munich) and the high altar retable of St. Peter's Church, the oldest parish church in Munich, which was once over six meters high. Five of these panels have been preserved (Diözesanmuseum Freising). It is in the nature of things that Jan Polack needed a large workshop to complete his commissions. For the retables he created, Polack also worked together with the leading sculptors of his time, first with the master of the Blutenburg Apostles and then with Erasmus Grasser.

 

The present work was evidently created as the predella of a former retable. A predella is a not too high pedestal that stands on the altar table (mensa) and supports the actual altarpiece, the reredos. A painting decorating this pedestal is also referred to as a predella.

 

The Holy Family is depicted. This is to be understood as a "family tree" of the Holy Family, a theme that became very popular in the second half of the 15th century. The Holy Kinship was intended to document the bodily and unbroken lineage of the Holy Family, an important concern in times of heated and controversial discussion of the dogma of the "Immaculata Conceptio", the "Immaculate Conception" of Mary. Specifically, this pictorial theme is about the "Trinubium", the three marriages of St. Anne. She was married to Joachim, Cleophas and Salomas. The descendants from this union are also not left out of the pictorial representation of the holy clan. The women are arranged as half-length figures in a rhythmically alternating order in a front layer, the men in another layer behind them. They are depicted from left to right, grouped into families and each given their name: Memelia with Servatius and Enim - Mary Salome with John the Evangelist, James the Elder and Zebedee - Mary and Joseph with Jesus Christ - Anna with her husbands Joachim and Salomas - Mary Cleopas with four children, including her sons James the Younger and Simon Zelotes - Cleophas (Anna's third husband) - Alphaeus, next to her, and Elizabeth with John the T. and Zechariah. What is also impressive about this work by Polack and his workshop is the wealth of clothing types and fantastic, sometimes oriental-looking head coverings. The hands are used to gesticulate. The faces are individualized, but in keeping with the pictorial theme they are not caricaturistically exaggerated. Only Zacharias, who concludes the composition on the right, shows Polack's otherwise typical physiognomy with an expressively exaggerated profile. A detail in the naming of the sitter speaks to the artist's creativity and humor: Alphaeus' name could no longer find a place directly next to or above his head due to the moving composition. Without further ado, Polack works with a "speech bubble" that extends from the button on Alphaeus' distinctive hat over Elisabeth's head.

Remains of an ornamental painting have been preserved on the upper edge of the painting. This must originally have been much wider; the altarpiece "St. Peter Teaching Christianity" from St. Peter's Church in Munich can be used as an example for comparison. This painting measured 59 centimetres in height when it was offered at the auction of the bequeathed Gesell Collection in 1872. When it was published by Theodor Frimmel in 1905, the panel had already been reduced in height.  

 

 

JAN POLACK UND WERKSTATT
um 1450 – 1519 München

DIE HEILIGE SIPPE (TRINUBIUM)

Mischtechnik auf Nadelholz. 34,5 × 188 cm (Tafel), 33 × 186 cm (Darstellung)

AUKTION 413 // LOT 126
SCHÄTZPREIS € 25.000 – 30.000

 


HONORARY


  BERNHARD STRIGEL
1460 Memmingen – 1528 ebenda

BILDNIS EINES HERRN MIT SCHWARZEM BARETT

Mischtechnik auf Holz (Linde?). 32,5 × 32,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 128
SCHÄTZPREIS € 5.000 – 7.000


A BLESSING


OBERITALIEN UM 1500

SEGNENDER CHRISTUS

Mischtechnik auf Holz. 58,5 × 40 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 125
SCHÄTZPREIS € 15.000 – 20.000

 

NIEDERLANDE
2. Drittel 16. Jh.

DER VERLORENE SOHN WIRD AUS DEM GASTHAUS GEJAGT

Öl auf Holz. D. 20,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 130
SCHÄTZPREIS € 2.000-3.000

 

WESTFALEN
1. Viertel 16. Jh.

 DIE HLL. KATHARINA VON SIENA UND AGNES

Öl auf Holz. 31,8 × 25,3 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 129
SCHÄTZPREIS € 4.000-6.000

 


MAXIMUM POWER


 

Maximilian of Austria (1459 Wiener Neustadt - 1519 Wels Castle) is already depicted as emperor, so the scene can be dated after the Tridentine Proclamation of February 4, 1508. The emperor, accompanied by his retinue, is presented with the keys to the city and the sword as symbols of the sovereign rights transferred to the emperor. The townspeople kneel on the right, led by the mayor and town commander, with the bishop standing between them to meet the emperor. The citizens leave the city over a bridge. Maximilian's encamped troops of lansquenets are depicted in the background.

 

Maximilian I's appointment as emperor was followed by the Great Venetian War (1508 - 1516). With French military assistance, Maximilian I was able to occupy Verona, Padua and Vicenza in June 1509, followed by Friuli. The subjugation of the northern Italian cities that were under Venetian rule was of great importance to Emperor Maximilian I's policy. This was also reflected in art, the most prominent example of which is a marble relief of Maximilian I's cenotaph in the Innsbruck Court Church. Scene 17 depicts the handover of Padua, Verona and Vicenza and large parts of Friuli to Maximilian in 1509. Even at the time of Emperor Ferdinand I, who had the tumba of the magnificent tomb for his grandfather decorated with illustrations of the most important events in the life of the "last knight", the events of 1509 in northern Italy were still of great importance. 

Events of 1509 are still of great importance. In the catalog of the Figdor 1930 auction, it is assumed that our scene is the surrender of the city of Gorizia, also in 1509. However, the city depicted in the background can most probably be identified as Verona, the double-towered church should be San Zeno, the river running around the city would be the Adige. The woodcut with the view of Verona published in Hartmann Schedel's Weltchronik in 1493 can be used as a rough comparison. The catalog text of the auction catalog refers to a stylistically related painting "Emperor Max Riding to the Tournament", which at the time was located in the vestibule of the official residence of Konopitsch Castle near Prague. Reference is also made to a fresco in Gorizia, which was largely destroyed in 1930 and is said to have depicted the scene in question. 

A comparison of the painting style with the works of artists working in Tyrol at the time reveals stylistic parallels with the work of Simon von Taisten, actually Simon Marenkl (around 1450/55 - around 1515), who worked in East Tyrol and was associated with Emperor Maximilian in 1507/09.

RS


 

GOLDEN RIDER 


ÖSTERREICH (TIROL)
nach 1509

ÜBERGABE EINER BEFESTIGTEN STADT (VERONA) AN KAISER MAXIMILIAN I.

Öl auf Nadelholz. 92 × 117,5 cm

AUKTION 413 // LOT 127

SCHÄTZPREIS € 12.000 – 15.000

THE ENTIRE COLLECTION AT A GLANCE

Seal of the bookbinders
Heidelberg, dated 1666

auction 413, Lot 111

estimate € 600 to € 800
result € 1.170 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A beak-spouted jug
German, 14th century

auction 413, Lot 112

estimate € 800 to € 1.000
result € 13.000 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A three-legged pot
German, late 15th century

auction 413, Lot 113

estimate € 1.200 to € 1.500
result € 10.400 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A box
Switzerland, 16th century and later

auction 413, Lot 114

estimate € 1.400 to € 1.600
result € 3.120 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Madonna with sewing basket
Utrecht, circa 1480/90

auction 413, Lot 115

estimate € 8.000 to € 12.000
result € 28.600 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Saint Dorothea
So-called Master of Osnabrück (active in Osnabrück and the surrounding area in the 1st third of the 16th century), circa 1510/20

auction 413, Lot 116

estimate € 4.000 to € 6.000
result € 27.300 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Blessing Christ Child
South German, 1st half of the 17th century

auction 413, Lot 117

estimate € 5.000 to € 7.000
result € 16.900 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Blessing Christ Child
Italy, 18th century

auction 413, Lot 118

estimate € 800 to € 1.200
result € 1.690 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A sacristy cabinet
Lake Constance region (Lindau), circa 1457

auction 413, Lot 119

estimate € 20.000 to € 30.000
result € 101.400 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A small chest
Veneto, 15th century

auction 413, Lot 120

estimate € 10.000 to € 12.000
result € 16.900 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A cassone
Upper Italy, circa 1500 and later

auction 413, Lot 121

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
result € 8.450 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A table
France, 16th century and later

auction 413, Lot 122

estimate € 3.000 to € 3.500
result € 2.600 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A cupboard
France, 17th/19th century

auction 413, Lot 123

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
result € 3.900 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

A chair with armrests
Northeastern Switzerland, dated 1716

auction 413, Lot 124

estimate € 1.000 to € 1.400
result € 3.380 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Oberitalien circa 1500
Blessing Christ

auction 413, Lot 125

estimate € 15.000 to € 20.000
result € 46.800 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Jan Polack und Werkstatt
um 1450 - 1519 München
The Holy Kinship (trinubium)

auction 413, Lot 126

estimate € 25.000 to € 30.000
result € 84.500 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Österreich (Tirol) after 1509
Handover of a fortified city (Verona) to Emperor Maximilian I

auction 413, Lot 127

estimate € 12.000 to € 15.000
result € 54.600 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Bernhard Strigel
1460 Memmingen - 1528 ebenda
Portrait of a man with a black beret

auction 413, Lot 128

estimate € 5.000 to € 7.000
result € 11.700 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Westfalen 1st quarter of the 16th century
Saint Catherine of Siena and Saint Agnes

auction 413, Lot 129

estimate € 4.000 to € 6.000
result € 7.150 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Antwerpen 2nd third of the 16th century
The Prodigal Son is chased out of the inn

auction 413, Lot 130

estimate € 2.000 to € 3.000
result € 2.600 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

Franz von Lenbach
1836 Schrobenhausen - 1904 München
Albert Figdor

auction 413, Lot 131

estimate € 3.000 to € 4.000
result € 33.800 (incl. 30 % buyer's premium)

ONLINECATALOGUE

LOTS 1 - 26, 2 PM
LOTS 50 - 124, CA. 2.30 PM
LOTS 125 - 228, CA. 3.30 PM
LOTS 300 - 338, CA. 5 PM

HIGHLIGHTS

FINE JEWELLERY
FINE ART AND ANTIQUES
FINE ART 16 - 20. CENTURY
MODERN & CONTEMPORARY ART