Editorial by Katrin Stoll

Dear friends of the arts,

don't you think this summer was special? After several lockdowns and other impositions of the pandemic, we were finally able to enjoy the the pleasure of lightness again. More normality was then also to be found in our successful June auction and the highly acclaimed special auction SHE. At last it was again possible to go out and talk over an "aperoil". get into conversation.

We humans are social beings and need creative exchange like the air we breathe. exchange like the air we breathe. 

In this sense, this magazine is also an magazine is also an expression of the lively communication that NEUMEISTER is in the city, in the country and in the world. Of course, this is primarily about sales. But it is also important to us to report on what fundamentally inspires and drives us. and drives us, especially in Munich, because this is where our auction house is our auction house is anchored in the heart of the city and its cultural life.

In this issue, we also invite you to a street art safari with a view to promoting culture and strengthening the location, and we look at the upheavals at the Bavarian State Opera. The links to content are always there: NEUMEISTER is as experimental as street art. And: I myself share some fundamental statements by Serge Dorny, the new artistic director of the Munich Opera House - when he says, for example, that art has an emancipatory dimension, that culture can therefore liberate us. In this respect, NEUMEISTER sees itself - beyond the actual auction business - as having a duty to promote the cultural, intellectual and social development of people through education and to create new creative spaces and playgrounds. 

This issue also shows how cool and exciting this can be. 

Yours sincerely

Katrin Stoll

JOY RIDE - Street Art in Munich

Häuserkampf

These murals cry out against the war, violence and injustice of the "Dark World".

murals. They are by world-renowned Urban artists and since 2017 have adorned several building facades on the former Siemens Campus in on Hofmannstraße. 

Self-portrait by Blek le Rat on Wurzerstraße. The peace dove was added later by banana sprayer Thomas Baumgärtel.

Art on the loo

Freddie Mercury, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Albert Einstein: during the lockdown in February 2020, portraits of the three celebrities, who all lived in Munich for a time, were created on an outhouse on Holzplatz.

STREET ART IN MUNICH STANDS FOR IMAGINATION WITHOUT LIMITS. ON SAFARI THROUGH A URBAN JUNGLE, WHERE COLOURFUL MESSAGES CORNER BLOOM. 

POSITIVE PICTURES 

I'm a bit tired of going for walks. But firstly, the Corona pounds have to be walked off again and secondly, it's high time to cover up the grey of the past year and a half with positive images. How nice that these can be found everywhere in Munich. Let's go on a city stroll of a special kind, or better: of street art. 

THE AWAKENING EXPERIENCE 

New York, London, Berlin. Sure. But who thinks of Munich when they think of street art? But it was actually the tranquil Bavarian capital that caused a sensation in the 1980s as the cradle of the German graffiti scene and pioneer of European street art. It all began on the night of 23 to 24 March 1985, when seven boys from the Munich area grabbed cans of paint and sprayed an S-Bahn from front to back (in scene parlance: "window-down end to end"). And because this first "whole train" in Germany was created on a siding at Geltendorf station, it went down in sprayer history as the "Geltendorf train". For Munich's street art expert Martin Arz, this illegal art action was the "big bang". The awakening experience, so to speak, for all the young savages who have since been applying their colourful messages to walls, bridge pillars and subways. 

BUILDING BRIDGES 

Also because private individuals, companies and authorities were open to street art, a unique street art gallery emerged across Munich over the years, which was also supplied with works by scene celebrities. Since 2013, one of the coolest locations has been under the Donnersberger Bridge, whose pillars have been embellished by 60 artists. In general, dreary subways were and are always particularly targeted by sprayers. For example, international artists transformed grey concrete pillars at Candidplatz into a bridge gallery under the motto "Building Bridges". The works are by Sebastian Wandl, L.E.T., Case, Herakut, Lapiz from New Zealand, Rone from Australia and the "Klebebande" from Berlin.

The bridges on the Isar River are a theme in themselves. Since 1996, young artists have been taking frequent turns to design the pillars of the Brudermühlbrücke, for example. On both banks, street art also brightens up the walls of dark subways. The paintings in the pedestrian tunnel of the Luitpold Bridge on the Friedensengel side already have cult status. Artists have realised themselves there in all the colours of the rainbow. Depending on the time of day, the wings of the bird leading up to the stairs shimmer differently, the man in Ze Carrion's depiction of ghastly scenes of violence appears even more menacing. There is no shortage of curiosities either: in February 2020, for example, portraits of Freddie Mercury, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Albert Einstein were created on a listed outhouse on Holzplatz - three celebrities who have one thing in common: They all lived in the Glockenbachviertel for a time. Martin Arz and Thomas Zufall, landlords of the café-bar "München 72", developed the concept of "The Pissoir". For the artistic design, they brought the street art group "Graphism" on board. 

MURAL AS HIGH AS A HOUSE 

One of Munich's most imposing street art works stands tall as a house at Bayerstraße 69, just around the corner from the main railway station. Matthias Köhler, internationally known as "Loomit", and Markus Müller ("WON ABC") created the graffito dedicated to Georg Elser (1903-1945) in summer 2017 on the 23-metre-high and over 11-metre-wide façade of a Stadtsparkasse branch. The two artistically combine the portrait of the failed Hitler assassin with images of eight other figures. What seems like a wild mixture at first glance is, on closer inspection, a clever gesamtkunstwerk full of (pop) cultural references. Daniel Düsentrieb, for example, symbolises Elser's technical skill. And Justitia, the goddess of justice, alludes to the fundamental question of whether one may take the risk of killing innocent people in order to remove a dictator. Also in summer 2017, huge murals were created on the former Siemens Campus in Hofmannstraße as part of the "SCALE -Urban WallArt Munich" street art and graffiti festival sponsored by a real estate company. Within a week, world-famous urban artists decorated the 90 and 150 square metre facades of the buildings close to each other with large-scale street art paintings - all completely legal, just like the Elser graffito, which was realised at the invitation of the newspapers tz and Münchner Merkur (see also interview on page 20 /21). 

BEAUTY AT THE SLAUGHTERHOUSE 

The city of Munich promoted murals in public spaces early on. As early as 1985, sprayers were given an area on a former barracks site on Dachauer Straße where they could legally let off steam. Today, places where even those who have not yet made a name for themselves in the scene can unpack their spray cans to legally embellish walls are rather rare. The hotspot here is mainly Tumblinger Straße in the Schlachthofviertel. Due to the limited space, however, the half-life of the artworks there is short. Works that have just been created are sometimes sprayed over after only a few hours, and the crowds visibly wear down the walls.

The exhibition "Icons of Urban Art" can be seen at the MUCA until December. It features many originals by the greats of the urban art scene. Banksy is also represented with key works.

CREATING SPACE IN COLLEGE

Finding public space for street and urban art, especially within the legal framework, is a problem for young artists in particular. It should be solved collectively, also in-house. broke.today has set itself the task of shaping the city as a creative playground under the motto "Just do it". The artists' collective, which has been active since 2019, wants to create spaces for all those who cannot afford studios or studios in expensive Munich and thus simultaneously promote newcomers and offer places of experience for culture and encounters. With "Traphouse", this has been impressively successful. As part of the project, a total of 27 artists were given the opportunity for 7 days in April 2021 to transform empty flats in a condemned building in Schwabing into a total work of art. An explosion of creativity took place over several floors in the course of the interim use, before the colourful spectacle was over again after a few weeks. Meanwhile, the scene is looking for and finding more off-locations, a current example being the project "La Maison Almedina". 

Germany's most colourful abattoir The extensive grounds of Munich's abattoir are now misused in the best sense of the word. The hotspot of the sprayer scene is Tumblinger Straße, where walls can be legally embellished with graffiti.

ART AND COMMERCE 

Despite all official acceptance, there are red lines: for example, the authorities always intervene when street art is created illegally and then have it removed immediately - unless it is a visual treat like the self-portrait that the Frenchman Blek le Rat painted behind the Hotel Vier Jahreszeiten on Wurzerstraße. The man is a star of the scene, the forefather of so-called stencils, i.e. graffiti applied with the help of stencils. He is thus considered the forerunner of the art scene's favourite phantom: Banksy. With this name, we are right in the middle of the discussion about art and commerce. Street art is supposed to be for everyone, but artists also want to make a living. And so street art becomes urban art. What was once only seen on the street now fetches top prices at auctions and is exhibited in galleries and museums. The Museum of Urban and Contemporary Art at www.muca.eu/ proves that all this does not have to be a contradiction in terms. The MUCA exhibits international urban art on 2,000 square metres in a former substation of the public utility company. Here it becomes clear that all this is not a finger exercise of half-strong wannabe Picassos - but: Art. Without you, everything is nothing. With this in mind, let's hit the streets! 

By Katja Kraft

FROM THE STREET INTO THE AUCTION HALL - A TALK WITH KATRIN STOLL, Managing Partner at NEUMEISTER

Under the bridge Munich's largest street art gallery is located under the Donnersberger Bridge. 60 artists have immortalised themselves there on walls and bridge piers.

NEUMEISTER as a specialist for old art - and then street art. How does that go together?

 

We honour our tradition, but at the same time we are open to experimentation and new ideas. But some of the early sprayers are almost classics. Everything is relative. In terms of content, there are also references between supposedly old and contemporary art. A good example is Carl Spitzweg's "Justitia", which we auctioned last year for around 700,000 euros. The painting from 1857 is highly topical in its message, because - as with street art - it is about the thematisation of right and wrong, about social criticism, about protest against the philistinism and the surveillance state - only everything is conveyed subtly instead of strikingly. Especially Justitia as a symbol of justice is taken up by street artists all over the world today and is unbroken in its topicality. The graffito on the Sparkasse façade in Munich's Bayerstraße is an example of this. And just think of Banksy, who in 2004 positioned a six-metre high and 3.5 tonne bronze statue of Justice in a London park in a night and fog action - in the look of a prostitute with knee-high patent leather boots, sexy lingerie, dollar bills stuffed into a garter and the inscription "Trust no one".

Street Art on the River
What museum can you jog or cycle through! On the Isar, this is possible in the pedestrian subway of the Luitpold Bridge, among other places. The path leads past well-preserved murals that are staged by artificial light sources.

What does street art have to do with auction houses and museums?

 

That has to do with the market economy. If there is demand, the market reacts and auction houses and galleries offer urban art. And as for museums: the MUCA shows how cool urban art can be presented. I always enjoy going to this much too little noticed museum - where we have already held a NEUMEISTER New Year's dinner.

What role does Urban Art currently play at NEUMEISTER?

 

Urban art still has a niche existence with us, but that could change. Apart from that, urban art comes up every now and then. In 2018, for example, we presented the photographic work "Freedom Graffiti. 2013" by the Damascus-born artist Tammam Azzam was auctioned. The estimate was 3,000 to 4,000 euros, and the work sold for 6,096 euros.

Tammam Azzam. Freedom Graffiti. 2013
AUCTION MODERN, POST WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

You don't know FRIEDRICH KARL GOTSCH?

 

You will learn more about him at the latest at the NEUMEISTER autumn auction. Because then the long forgotten, now rediscovered Neo-Expressionist will be represented with no less than 36 works. This is a first-class opportunity to acquire a work by the artist at a reasonable price.

 

As a foretaste of the contemporary art coming up for auction in the autumn, we would like to recommend two hyper-realistic works by GOTTFRIED HELNWEIN, a subtly exciting work by CHRISTIAN BRANDL, who is currently in great demand, and "Nichtstrieb" by BERND KOBERLING, a co-founder of the junge Wilden.

 

GERHARD RICHTER reveals his grey view of the Swiss Alps in a serigraphy, ECKART HAHN transfers mountains into living spaces.

 

Finally, the "elemental painting" of the German-American painter JERRY ZENIUK, who was professor of painting and graphic arts at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich from 1993 to 2011, gets to the heart of the matter. Exciting and fascinating are the works of the Croatian painter EDO MURTIC.

 AUCTIONS MODERN, POST WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

23 SEPTEMBER, 4 PM

 

VIEWING DAYS 16 - 20 SEPTEMBER
daily 10 am - 5 pm
Sa, Su 10 am - 3 pm

WORLDPREMIER - FRIEDRICH KARL GOTSCH

AVAILABLE IN AUTUMN: 36 WORKS BY FRIEDRICH KARL GOTSCH FROM A FAMOUS PRIVATE COLLECTION

Prints, works on paper, oil paintings. The works, never before offered on the art market, cover the artist's entire creative period.

Recognized? The background is not a concrete wall, but the ceiling of Munich's Pinakothek der Moderne.

IN THE SHADOW OF THE GREAT

ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER, ERICH HECKEL OR ALEXEJ VON JAWLENSKY. YOU KNOW THEM. BUT THERE IS A SECOND GENERATION OF ARTISTS WHO - BORN AROUND 1900 - FOLLOWED THE GREAT GERMAN EXPRESSIONISTS AND STOOD IN THEIR SHADOW. DEPRIVED OF ANY POSSIBILITY OF REALISATION BY NATIONAL SOCIALISM, THEY WERE FROM THEN ON SIMPLY FORGOTTEN. FRIEDRICH KARL GOTSCH SHARED THIS FATE. 

Everything got off to a promising start. Gotsch studied economics, philosophy and art history, at the same time taking private painting lessons with Hans Ralfs in Kiel. Ralfs recognised Gotsch's talent and showed him the way to the Expressionists, above all to Edvard Munch, who would be a lifelong inspiration for Gotsch. In 1920 the young man had his first solo exhibition at the Kunsthalle Kiel - an encouraging success that Gotsch celebrated at the beginning of his art studies in Dresden. From 1920 to 1923 he studied on the Elbe as a master student with Oskar Kokoschka, who left his artistic mark on him. 

After his art studies, Gotsch travelled to New York, Paris and Italy with his girlfriend Hilde Goldschmidt. When the attacks against Jews increased in 1933, Goldschmidt fled abroad, while Gotsch went to Berlin. Terrible years of artistic isolation and human impositions followed. Gotsch was not banned from painting, but the National Socialists increasingly obstructed his work: the Expressionist had to hide his paintings, and numerous works were lost. And while Gotsch was doing his war service as an interpreter, his Berlin studio was destroyed by bombs. 

Gotsch survived the Nazi era unbroken, but after the war abstract painting became the norm, expressionists were hardly noticed, and no one was interested in Gotsch any more. The defiant loner is hurt and embittered, but resumes his artistic activity. In his confrontation with abstraction and Picasso's Cubism, he developed a new and very individual late Expressionist style. Incidentally, the artist painted over and destroyed many of his surviving paintings and reworked them according to his new stylistic criteria; this is another reason why only a few paintings from his early creative period have survived. Gotsch succeeded in regaining recognition for his painting during his lifetime. Numerous solo exhibitions and the acquisition of a large part of his works for the collection of the Petit Palais in Geneva in 1964, as well as the establishment of the K. F. Gotsch Foundation at the Schleswig-Holstein State Museum in 1968, helped Gotsch to achieve national recognition. He also received a number of awards, for example the Villa Romana Prize and an honorary professorship from the state of Schleswig-Holstein. Portraits, still lifes, landscapes. Classical, mythological, religious and literary themes. Friedrich Karl Gotsch left us a diverse oeuvre. It will continue to have an effect. And now, at the latest, the time is ripe for the rediscovery of an underestimated expressionist.

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Das Kind im Pelzmantel. 1922/1950

auction 402, Lot 1000

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Capri. 1928/50er Jahre

auction 402, Lot 1004

estimate € 7.000 to € 9.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Selbstporträt mit blauer Kappe. 1929

auction 402, Lot 1005

estimate € 8.000 to € 10.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Liliencron. 1954

auction 402, Lot 1014

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Atelierinterieur. 1957

auction 402, Lot 1016

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Tessiner Bäuerin mit Kind. 1959

auction 402, Lot 1017

estimate € 5.000 to € 7.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Bildnis einer Dame. 1959

auction 402, Lot 1019

estimate € 5.000 to € 7.000
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Der Blitz - La Foudre. 1964

auction 402, Lot 1023

estimate € 1.000 to € 1.500
still available

Friedrich Karl Gotsch - Fünf Monotypien. 1964

auction 402, Lot 1031

estimate € 800 to € 1.000
still available

CHILDISH NIGHTMARES - GOTTFRIED HELNWEIN

The Irish-Austrian artist Gottfried Helnwein is today one of the most successful and best-known German-speaking artists of the post-war period. He is known for his hyper-realistic paintings and photographic portraits of celebrities such as Mick Jagger, Michael Jackson, Andy Warhol, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Marilyn Manson and the band Rammstein. His pictures show gripping but also shocking themes of violence and abuse, often maltreated children, covered in bruises, wounds or bandages. His basic theme remains violence, especially the physical and mental suffering of children. A symbol of absolute forlornness and pure despair is the work "Der Frevel". 

Since the end of the 1970s, Helnwein has increasingly devoted himself to the figures of pop and trivial culture, borrowing from his role model Walt Disney. In doing so, he basically uses the visual language and forms of comics - but integrates and combines figures from entirely different worlds, creating a completely new context. 

Gottfried Helnwein often refers to childhood nightmares. Criminal Tango" (see pp. 32/33), which shows a screaming woman in a blouse and skirt against a dark background, also comes from this world. She desperately covers her ears with both hands, her eyes are also closed, her face is altogether distorted. In front of her hovers a mean laughing sausage with a Zorro mask - it seems to have it in for the woman. Technically, everything is in painterly meticulous perfection - typical of Helnwein's hyperrealism. The viewer is fascinated and disturbed at the same time, which is also due to the fact that the figures depicted know more than we can read out.

BY IPEK BLASK, NEUMEISTER EXPERT PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS, GRAPHICS, SCULPTURES 20TH/21ST CENTURY

Gottfried Helnwein - Kriminaltango. 1983

auction 402, Lot 1062

estimate € 15.000 to € 20.000
still available

Gottfried Helnwein - Der Frevel

auction 402, Lot 1063

estimate € 1.000 to € 1.500
still available

Antal Ligeti (1823 Nagykároly - 1890 Budapest)

Die Werke des 1970 in Erfurt geborenen Künstlers Christian Brandl strahlen Klarheit und Ruhe aus, bei näherer Betrachtung spürt man jedoch eine ungewöhnliche Spannung. Der Künstler zeigt eine Momentaufnahme mit Figuren, die beunruhigt wirken. Der Betrachter fragt sich zwangsläufig, was wohl passiert sein mag. Genau das macht den Reiz und die Besonderheit der Bilder aus. Brandls Stil lässt schon erahnen, dass wir es hier mit einem bedeutenden Künstler der berühmten „Neuen Leipziger Schule“ zu tun haben, der zu den wichtigen Vertretern der zeitgenössischen figurativen Malerei Deutschlands gehört.

Christian Brandl - Flucht. 2010

auction 402, Lot 1074

estimate € 8.500 to € 10.500
still available

Works by Christian Brandl are currently in high demand. This was also evident at the NEUMEISTER spring auction. After exciting bidding battles, Brandl's work "Am Meer" changed hands for 21,590 euros, significantly exceeding the estimate of 8,000 to 10,000 euros.

MILD WINTER - BERND KOBERLING

Bernd Koberling - Nichtstrieb. 1996

auction 402, Lot 1067

estimate € 8.000 to € 12.000
still available

SUMMIT DREAM - SUMMIT ROOM - GERHARD RICHTER - ECKART HAHN

Gerhard Richter - Schweizer Alpen II. 1969

auction 402, Lot 1059

estimate € 4.000 to € 6.000
still available

Gerhard Richter - Schweizer Alpen II. 1969

auction 402, Lot 1060

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
still available

Eckart Hahn - Stille. 2003

auction 402, Lot 1072

estimate € 7.000 to € 9.000
still available

COLOUR AND MOVEMENT - EDO MURTIC

Edo Murtic - Velký záliv (Große Bucht). 1990

auction 402, Lot 1090

estimate € 6.000 to € 9.000
still available

Edo Murtic - Ocakávania (Erwartung). 1992

auction 402, Lot 1091

estimate € 8.000 to € 12.000
still available

TO THE POINT - JERRY ZENIUK

Jerry Zeniuk - Untitled. 1999

auction 402, Lot 1070

estimate € 3.000 to € 5.000
still available

Jerry Zeniuk - Ohne Titel. 1999

auction 402, Lot 1071

estimate € 3.000 to € 5.000
still available

AUCTION WORKS ON PAPER AND PAINTINGS 15. - 20. CENTURY

To experience the magical play of colours in the "Pontine Marshes at Sunset", you don't have to go to the Berlin National Gallery. You can also admire the famous painting by AUGUST KOPISCH in our auction room, where one of the versions of this work will be called at the NEUMEISTER autumn auction.

 

In general, we will be moving close to the water: landscapes by river and sea will be contributed by JOHANN GEORG SCHÜTZ and FERNAND-MARIEEUGÈNE LEGOUT-GÉRARD, among others.

 

MARTEN VAN VALCKENBORCH's "River Landscape with Flock of Sheep and Flight into Egypt" and JAN GRIFFIER's "Wide River Landscape" are real gems.

 

MAURICE CHABAS puts bathers in the picture.

 

Genre painting of the 19th century is also strongly represented in the autumn. Insights into folk life are provided by JOHANN SPERLS' masterpiece "Kirchweihfest", LORENZO QUAGLIO's "Fröhliche Gesellschaft vor dem Berggasthaus" and EUGEN HOFMEISTER's "Sonntag in einer schwäbischen Bauernfamilie". FRITZ FREUND also contributes subjects from peasant life. And "The Disinterested Schoolmaster" by HANNO RHOMBERG shows how to wrap up a teacher.

 

Friends of top-class portraits will be delighted by the "Portrait of a Young Woman with a Crown" by JAN VAN BIJLERT. A real eye-catcher is also the small "Self-Portrait of an Artist with a Drawing Pencil", which was left to us by an unknown painter.

 

CARL SPITZWEG, on the other hand, is no stranger to the autumn, represented among other things by the oil study "Portrait of a Turk" and the drawing "Oriental with Chibuk".

 

And now enjoy browsing through our painting gallery

AUCTION WORKS ON PAPER AND PAINTINGS 

15. - 20. CENTURY

23 SEPTEMBER, 2 PM


VIEWING DAYS 16 - 20 SEPTEMBER

daily 10 am - 5 pm
Sa, Su 10 am - 3 pm

PAINTINGS 19 AND 20 CENTURY

EMBLEM OF TRANSIENCE - AUGUST KOPISCH

AUGUST KOPISCH IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE MOST VERSATILE ARTISTS OF THE 19TH CENTURY. THE PAINTER AND POET ("THE HEINZELMÄNNCHEN") WAS ALSO AN INVENTOR (FAST OVEN) AND EXPLORER. ALWAYS CURIOUS, ALWAYS ON THE LOOKOUT, HE DISCOVERED CAPRI'S BLUE GROTTO (1826) OR WALKED CALMLY ON AN ERUPTING VOLCANO. LIFE AS A GRATUITY FOR AN EXTRAORDINARY MAN WHOSE INTEREST WAS ALWAYS IN THE SUBLIME AND THE STRANGE.

It was a hotbed of malaria, herds of black buffalo roamed the dreaded swamplands of the Paludi Pontine, which stretched along both sides of the Via Appia in the southeast of Rome on the way to Naples. It was not until the 20th century that the marshes, which had been a thriving region in antiquity, were drained, thus also defeating a focus of malaria that had repeatedly afflicted Rome until then.

The sublimity of the decaying mythological landscape inspired numerous artists. With their half-sunken fragments of ancient buildings and sculptures overgrown by nature, the Pontine Marshes became a symbol of the transience of human culture. Goethe described them in his Italian Journey - and August Kopisch brought them to canvas with poetic radiance. Which brings us to the present composition, considered one of the artist's major works: from an elevated position and with our gaze directed into the distance, we witness the indulgent play of colours of a glowing red sunset and magical mirror effects on the water surfaces. But it is best described by the painter himself. In his letter to the Berlin banker and collector Joachim Heinrich Wilhelm Wagener, he says: "One looks across the Pomtine marshes into the Tyrrhenian Sea, into which the sun's disc is about to sink. The crimson sky of Scirocco is mirrored by flood waters, which the river Nymphaeus leads to the sea. In the background, to the left, the promontory of Monte Circello rises from the reedy plains, the former island of the Kirke, still further one of the Ponza islands. To the right of the river one sees a dilapidated water conduit from the times of the Caesars; in the foreground a half-Roman, half-medieval castle ruin with a round tower. The staffage is formed by a herd of wild buffaloes swimming from bank to bank." 

There is evidence of three versions of August Kopisch's Pontine Marshes: the probably first and much acclaimed version, which Kopisch showed at the Berlin Academy Exhibition in 1839, was acquired by the Prussian king. This painting was in the Potsdam City Palace until 1945 and was lost in the war. A second version from 1848 is now in the Berlin National Gallery. A third version was privately owned in Berlin - and is possibly the one now being auctioned by NEUMEISTER.

BY BARBARA HUBER, NEUMEISTER EXPERT ON PAINTINGS AND GRAPHIC ART UP TO THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY

August Kopisch - Die Pontinischen Sümpfe bei Sonnenuntergang

auction 402, Lot 493

estimate € 15.000 to € 20.000
still available

Á LA FRANCAISE - FRENCH PAINTINGS FROM 19 CENTURY

Fernand-Marie-Eugène Legout-Gérard (Le Gout-Gérard) - In einer bretonischen Hafenstadt

auction 402, Lot 552

estimate € 10.000 to € 15.000
still available

Maurice Chabas - Badende

auction 402, Lot 557

estimate € 5.000 to € 6.000
still available

George Alfred Bottini - Der Kostümball

auction 402, Lot 559

estimate € 2.000 to € 2.500
still available

Narcisse Virgile Diaz de la Peña - "Mare et fagotière"

auction 402, Lot 570

estimate € 5.500 to € 6.000
still available

Victor Alfred Paul Vignon - "Chemin à la boue"

auction 402, Lot 571

estimate € 5.500 to € 6.500
still available

Paul Emmanuel Péraire - Paris - Rue de lAbreuvoir, Montmartre

auction 402, Lot 572

estimate € 1.000 to € 1.200
still available

LONGING FOR A LOST TIME

Southern German paintings of the 19th century depicting cheerful folk life have loyal followers. Probably not only because these works are masterfully executed and correspondingly valuable. The motive for purchase also seems to be the longing for a lost time, together with its cherished traditions. This is also reflected in the numerous works that will be offered at the NEUMEISTER autumn auction.

Lorenzo Quaglio - Fröhliche Gesellschaft vor dem Berggasthaus

auction 402, Lot 495

estimate € 12.000 to € 15.000
still available

Hanno Rhomberg - Der uneigennützige Schulmeister

auction 402, Lot 497

estimate € 6.500 to € 8.000
still available

Eugen Hofmeister - Sonntag in einer schwäbischen Bauernfamilie

auction 402, Lot 498

estimate € 6.000 to € 8.000
still available

Johann Sperl - Kirchweihfest

auction 402, Lot 499

estimate € 30.000 to € 40.000
still available

FOREST AND MEADOW - FRITZ FREUND

The oeuvre of Fritz Freund, nine of whose works are represented in this auction, also includes genre depictions of rural life as well as impressionist landscapes. The painter studied at the Munich Academy from 1881 to 1887 under Gabriel von Hackl, Nikolaus Gysis and Wilhelm Lindenschmit the Younger. From 1900 onwards, he regularly spent his summer months in Miesbach, where he moved his entire residence in 1919.

Fritz Freund - Hirtenknabe auf dem Gipfel

auction 402, Lot 425

estimate € 150 to € 200
still available

Fritz Freund - "Die Geschwister"

auction 402, Lot 509

estimate € 1.000 to € 1.200
still available

Fritz Freund - "Die Waldbank"

auction 402, Lot 510

estimate € 1.500 to € 2.000
still available

Fritz Freund - Waldweg

auction 402, Lot 511

estimate € 600 to € 800
still available

Fritz Freund - Moorlandschaft mit Strohmandl

auction 402, Lot 512

estimate € 400 to € 600
still available

Fritz Freund - Weg im Gebirge

auction 402, Lot 513

estimate € 400 to € 600
still available

Fritz Freund - Gebirgslandschaft mit Bauerngehöft

auction 402, Lot 514

estimate € 600 to € 800
still available

Fritz Freund - "Spaziergang"

auction 402, Lot 515

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

Fritz Freund - Landschaft bei aufziehendem Gewitter

auction 402, Lot 516

estimate € 600 to € 800
still available

PAINTINGS 15 UNTIL 18 CENTURY

17 AND 18 CENTURY LANDSCAPES

Johann Georg Schütz (Schüz) - Baumbestandene Fluss- bzw. Uferlandschaft mit Figurenstaffage

auction 402, Lot 416

estimate € 2.000 to € 2.500
still available

Marten van Valckenborch - Flusslandschaft mit Schafherde und Flucht nach Ägypten

auction 402, Lot 437

estimate € 15.000 to € 20.000
still available

Jan Griffier - Weite Flusslandschaft

auction 402, Lot 440

estimate € 4.000 to € 6.000
still available

MOMENTS

Jan van Bijlert (Bylert) - Bildnis einer jungen Frau mit Krone

auction 402, Lot 436

estimate € 8.000 to € 10.000
still available

Deutsch - Franz Georg Reichsgraf von Schönborn

auction 402, Lot 469

estimate € 10.000 to € 12.000
still available

Deutsch - Selbstporträt eines Künstlers mit Zeichengriffel

auction 402, Lot 475

estimate € 2.000 to € 3.000
still available

WORKS ON PAPER 19 AND 20 CENTURY

CARL SPITZWEG

Carl Spitzweg - Orientale mit Tschibuk

auction 402, Lot 420

estimate € 800 to € 1.200
still available

Carl Spitzweg - Gebirgslandschaften - Blütenstudie - Pferde - Wirtsgarten

auction 402, Lot 421

estimate € 1.500 to € 1.800
still available

Carl Spitzweg - "Brustbild eines Türken"

auction 402, Lot 486

estimate € 7.500 to € 8.500
still available

OPERA IN TRANSITION

EVERY HUMAN BEING A KING

An expansive building for the Volkstheater, cool interim quarters for the Philharmonie and a facelift for the Glyptothek: Munich's cultural landscape was repositioned in autumn. The Bavarian State Opera is also undergoing a radical change. Serge Dorny will be the new artistic director for the 2021/22 season. What drives the man? We wanted to know. Because we at NEUMEISTER - like many art lovers in our vicinity - are enthusiastic opera fans.

VISIONS IN HIS LUGGAGE

First of all, Serge Dorny has an impressive CV - and visions.

Above all, he wants to open up the house to a broader, more diverse audience through new formats. In doing so, Dorny is seamlessly following his time at the Opéra National de Lyon, where he was a highly successful artistic director from 2003 to 2021. Now the 59-year-old wants to reach out to the people at his new place of work and enter into dialogue, both with the audience and with other cultural institutions. Dorny has far-reaching networking beyond Max-Joseph-Platz in mind, and is open, for example, to cooperations with academies, museums and the Biennale.

OPERA AS A LIVING ART FORM

A house in which Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Richard Wagner and Johann Strauss are not only performed but are living history is a challenge for any artistic director. Dorny accepts it confidently, curiously and respectfully. "This rich history of the Bavarian State Opera makes me humble - but also proud to be a part of it," he emphasises. "It spurs us on to be inventive, to let tradition form an inspiring union with innovation, so that opera continues to be a living art form." He would like to challenge the Munich opera audience, which is spoiled in the best sense of the word, "demand more of them" and "even expect something from them now and then". And so - together with General Music Director Vladimir Jurowski as another newcomer at his side - he chooses the philanthropic motto "Every Man a King" for their first season together. The new productions will then also deal with this "royal masterpiece" called Man. Nine of the eleven opera premieres in the new season are pieces from the 20th and 21st centuries. So does Dorny want to concentrate primarily on contemporary music in the future? Dorny's retort: "Are 20th century works still contemporary, or are they already part of our music-theatrical heritage?" With this counter-question, Dorny makes it clear that for him the distinction between music of the past, the so-called classical period, and contemporary music is not so crucial. "For me, contemporary is everything that surrounds us today. All music that we hear hic et nunc is contemporary, whether it comes from Claudio Monteverdi or Georg Friedrich Haas."

BAVARIA AT A GLANCE 

Thinking in pigeonholes - that becomes clear when you listen to Serge Dorny - is not his thing. And because the new head of the BAVARIAN STATE OPERA also sees himself as such, he wants to make his house a cultural magnet for the entire Free State. The popular "Opera for All", launched by his predecessor Sir Peter Jonas as a free open-air event for everyone, is therefore to be staged as a September festival in a different place in Bavaria. Here too: the desire to further develop the tried and tested - and also a bow to Sir Peter Jonas. "Our work will be characterised by our great respect for the history of this house and for those who have gone before us. It will be inspired by their inventiveness, their daring and their joy of discovery," Dorny emphasises. YES, MAY But how to inspire people not only outside but also behind the formidable walls of the opera house? For Dorny, the answer is clear: you have to go out yourself, go to the people, so that they gradually dare to enter. One of these appetisers with which the new artistic director wants to inspire people of all ages and income groups is called "Yes, May". In spring 2022, the new annual festival dedicated to early and contemporary music theatre will be celebrated for the first time. The approach is also broad for the also newly introduced Offstage 360, a particularly colourful and diversely conceived format. Through participation in projects and club nights as well as other music-theatre offers, everyone should have the opportunity to "try things out, regardless of education, social status or background", Dorny emphasises. Music theatre lives "with and from the people in the city". And if the concept works out, many a person who until now only sat on the steps of the Bavarian State Opera to applaud the sunset while having a drink will stand up and, after the intermission gong, enter a house that is likely to enrich and surprise Munich's cultural landscape in the years to come. Serge Dorny and his team will make sure of that. 

BY KATJA KRAFT

ART FOR THE STAGE

Visual artists have been involved in musical theatre for more than 100 years. They also shape productions in Bavaria. Between Spring and Winter Lockdown 2020, for example, "7 Deaths of Maria Callas", an opera project by performance artist Marina Abramovic, celebrated a silent premiere in Munich. At the last Opera Festival, Phyllida Barlow created the stage design for the new production of "Idomeneo" - at the same time, a major retrospective was dedicated to the British sculptress at the Haus der Kunst. Meanwhile, the action artist Hermann Nitsch's colourful poured paintings underscored Wagner's "Walküre" at the Bayreuth Festival. Georg Baselitz had already designed the stage set for "Parsifal" for the Bavarian State Opera in 2018. Baselitz or Picasso: important artists have created stage designs time and again. And works by painters who set stages with their works also bring music into play at auctions. Sometimes, however, there are quite different references. For example, two paintings from the collection of Sir Peter Jonas, who died in 2020, will be auctioned at the NEUMEISTER autumn auction. The credo of the long-time artistic director of the Bavarian State Opera was to provide access to music not only for the initiated - motto: "Opera for everyone! Tip: This is also the title of the biography of Sir Peter Jonas written by Julia Glesner, with a foreword by Donna Leon and published by Insel Verlag. After reading it, it becomes clear that the man was a religious man - indeed, that his fascination for opera developed from his enthusiasm for church music. The two works of art to be auctioned in the autumn can also be placed in this context: a Madonna and Child in the style of Pietro Lorenzetti (lot 431) and a Flemish Pietà from the 16th century (lot 433).

AUCTION FINE ART AND ANTIQUES

Simply moving: The statue of St. Thomas, attributed to FRANCESCO MOCHI and made around 1640, who simply cannot believe that Jesus has risen from the dead, is a highlight of the NEUMEISTER autumn auction.

 

Other objects in the sector of arts and crafts and antiques are also about emotions. For example, the GOTIC SCULPTURES from a Swabian collection are deeply moving.

 

Not only masterfully executed, but also reflecting the spirit of their time, we recommend the HISTORICAL FURNITURE of the auction - from the commode of the MÜNCHNER HOFWERKSTÄTTEN made around 1740 to the "Chinese Chairs" by KARL SPRINGER produced about 250 years later.

 

The FRENCH AND GERMAN FAYENCES, which came to Barer Straße from two collections, are rarely beautiful and are called for at moderate estimated prices.

 

Must-haves for porcelain lovers are JOSEF WACKERLE's decorative "Tag" and a precious MEISSENER coffee pot.

 

As examples of cultivated drinking culture, we also present an ivory cup of princely provenance and a communion jug made around 1600.

And why else should you bid for arts and crafts and antiques in autumn? NEUMEISTER expert Dr. Doris Bachmeier provides the answers.

AUCTION FINE ART AND ANTIQUES
22 SEPTEMBER AT 2 PM

 Viewing Days 16 - 20 September

Mo to Fr from 10 am until 5 pm
Sa and Su from 10 am until 3 pm

BAROQUE SCULPTURE - A MATTER OF FAITH

- Kniender (Ungläubiger Thomas)

auction 402, Lot 132

estimate € 15.000 to € 18.000
still available

Three Gothic sculptures from an important Upper Swabian collection will be offered at the autumn auction.
Each of them is a must-have for lovers of exquisite sculptures.

GOTHIC SCULPTURES - BEAUTIFUL THINGS FROM SWABIA

- Hl. Johannes d. T.

auction 402, Lot 125

estimate € 9.000 to € 11.000
still available

- Hl. Sebastian

auction 402, Lot 128

estimate € 12.000 to € 14.000
still available

- Marienkrönung

auction 402, Lot 130

estimate € 35.000 to € 38.000
still available

ESSENTIAL FURNITURE

- Kommodenaufsatzschreibschrank

auction 402, Lot 149

estimate € 8.000 to € 12.000
still available

- Kommode

auction 402, Lot 151

estimate € 15.000 to € 20.000
still available

- Salontisch

auction 402, Lot 162

estimate € 4.000 to € 6.000
still available

SIT IN - KARL SPRINGER

Berlin-born Karl Springer (1931-1991) moved to the USA in 1957 and settled in New York. Initially working for Lord & Taylor, his handmade designs soon attracted attention at the luxury department stores' Bergdorf Goodmann. Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor, discovered Springer early on and recommended him to friends and acquaintances. Then celebrities such as Jackie Onassis, Diana Ross and Frank Sinatra became his clients. Springer founded his own workshop and focused on designing and producing furniture. In the 1970s, he opened a large showroom in New York City; galleries in Miami, Los Angeles and Tokyo were to follow. In the 1990s, his company, Karl Springer Ltd, also had a branch in Munich. The relentless pursuit of high quality, an incomparable sense of proportion, simple forms, attention to detail and dedication to uncompromising craftsmanship contributed significantly to Karl Springer's success. He was inspired by Art Deco and Bauhaus, but also by ancient China and African Ashanti art. Numerous journeys provided him with ideas for new forms and materials.

BY DR. BÄRBEL WAUER, NEUMEISTER EXPERT ON ART NOUVEAU, ART DECO, APPLIED ART OF THE 20TH CENTURY

 

 

Typical of Springer's work is the use of exotic and luxurious materials such as IN shagreen, lacquered parchment, rare woods, precious metals and Lucite - a transparent, particularly break-resistant and elastic plastic, which is also at play in the four "Chinese Chairs" that will be auctioned by NEUMEISTER in autumn.

 

 

- "Chinese chair"

auction 402, Lot 107

estimate € 8.000 to € 10.000
still available

- "Chinese chair"

auction 402, Lot 108

estimate € 8.000 to € 10.000
still available

- "Chinese chair"

auction 402, Lot 109

estimate € 8.000 to € 10.000
still available

- "Chinese chair"

auction 402, Lot 110

estimate € 8.000 to € 10.000
still available

"I DON'T TURN OVER PLATES"
EIN GESPRÄCH mit DR. DORIS BACHMEIER, NEUMEISTER-Expertin für Keramik,
Porzellan, Silber, Uhren, Volkskunst, Kunsthandwerk und Ikonen

Do you turn over the plates when you are invited to dinner at a friend's house?

 Oh no...!

Seriously. What's it like when you've been professionally involved with beautiful and valuable art objects for so many years? Is one still impartial? 

Hm, I tend to look at things from a scientific point of view. That's an occupational disease. But I can also switch over and just let everything have an emotional effect on me and enjoy it - whether in a church, a museum or over a meal with friends.

Do you love your profession? 

Very much! I've been doing it for more than three decades now, and even though routine comes into play over time, it never gets boring. The art historical field I deal with is incredibly diverse. There is always something new to discover, and of course the objects I receive are always good for surprises.

What was your biggest surprise? 

I spontaneously think of the pair of Meissen vases that were made exclusively for the Saxon King August the Strong. Only a few days before the auction, it turned out that these vases belonged to the legendary porcelain collection of Hermine Feist, who died in 1933 - and were registered in the LostArt database. In order to create legal certainty, we immediately contacted the heirs and succeeded in reaching a settlement with their lawyer within three days and two minutes before the auction started. Due to the quick and complete clarification of the provenance, the auction result - within minutes - was 107,950 Euros. The estimate of 6,000 to 8,000 euros was thus exceeded many times over.

Sounds exciting. 

And it is. The interest is there, especially if the objects are rare, of the best quality and of interesting provenance. This is also reflected in very good auction results. The pair of vases from the Feist collection is just one example. At every auction there are such pleasing outliers to the top. For example, a 59-piece Nymphenburg pearl service fetched 17,780 euros at our auction in May 2020 - with an estimated price of 1,200 euros. But that is a lot of money.

Don't you go to an auction to get something cheaper than elsewhere? 

That is not a contradiction. For a 59-piece Nymphenburg pearl service, you still pay more than 17,780 euros elsewhere. But there is always something for smaller budgets, too.

It all sounds as if porcelain & co. is also in vogue in the digital age. Isn't that anachronistic? 

On the contrary. Old and new go well together. A rethink has taken place here recently. Particularly among younger people, who have no use for new goods that are devoid of meaning, but rather take much more pleasure in charging their modern living environment with the content of objects of art from the past. Preserving instead of throwing away is the order of the day.

So a whole new generation of collectors is growing up? 

The number of classic collectors who buy specifically to display their treasures in a glass showcase is decreasing. Anyone who buys an object at NEUMEISTER is no longer thinking primarily about adding to a collection. Rather, it is a question of use. People don't just want to look at the objects, they want to use them every day. Whether it's a 300-year-old coffee pot, an Art Nouveau vase or a silver candlestick from the Baroque period - things should and want to be used.

Is that how you keep things at home? 

I don't have a display cabinet in which Meissen porcelain collects dust. There are just a few beautiful individual pieces that I have acquired over the years. And I use them. It's good for the things. That way, silver doesn't tarnish if you use it all the time.

How did you actually get into art? 

My father was a stonemason. And when there were museums, churches and monuments somewhere, we all went there. That must have influenced me. I then studied art history in Munich and worked at the State Office for the Preservation of Historical Monuments at the same time. My doctorate was on the sculptor and interior designer Lorenz Gedon. Gedonstraße in Schwabing is named after him.

When did it all start for you at NEUMEISTER? 

That was in 1988, directly after my doctorate.

Not a desk job? 

No, cataloguing eats up a lot of time, but you also meet interesting people and get to know exciting places.

For example? 

Sárvár, a rather unspectacular little town in Hungary. Ludwig III and his relatives lived there in exile for a time. Treasures from the House of Wittelsbach, which were hidden behind the thick walls of a castle there for many years, were recently sold at a special auction. I myself had the privilege of travelling to Sárvár. This is how history becomes tangible and alive.

A hot tip for the autumn auction?

 

Faience. We'll be offering a whole group of them. And at favourable estimated prices. Bargains are possible here

SELTEN. SCHÖN.

If an object fetches ten times the asking price at auction, it may be a faience work. The value of these historically important ceramic works is often underestimated, even by experts. But faiences have become rare, and the number of workshops that still produce high-quality art ceramics today is also decreasing worldwide. And the importance of the objects for collectors is thus increasing.

A GIFT FROM PICASSO
Throughout the centuries, famous artists have created faience. The fact that even the elite of the modern age has taken up the material of ceramics is also due to Faenza, the place of origin of faience, and to activists and promoters such as Gaetano Ballardini, who laid the foundation stone for the International Museum of Ceramics (MIC) there as early as 1908 with a foundation. The Faenza Prize has been awarded every two years since 1938 as part of a ceramic art competition. After the Second World War, Ballardini asked artists all over the world to send works to the bombed-out museum - and received objects by Chagall, Matisse and Picasso, who discovered (faience) ceramics as an art form for himself in Vallauris in the south of France.

TRIUMPH IN THE SOUTH 

Faience is a special type of glazed pottery whose origins are thought to date back some 2,500 years to Mesopotamia and Persia. The technique reached Spain and Portugal via North Africa around 800 AD. In the 14th and 15th centuries, Andalusian ceramics were finally exported via Mallorca to Italy, to Florence as well as to Faenza, where there were rich deposits of clay and loam. There, the ceramic technique called "majolica" - after the place of origin Mallorca - was further developed. The earthenware was now covered with a white glaze, the tin glaze, which made the porous clay impermeable and smooth. Instead of flat decorations, the trend was towards noble white ceramics with stylishly restrained painting, similar to that of precious Chinese porcelain. Porcelain from China was in great demand in Europe at the time, but could not be produced here because an important mineral was missing. It was not until March 1709 that European porcelain was invented in Meissen. In France, the luxury ceramics imported from Faenza in Italy were called "faïence". People began to produce their own faïences, and in the course of the 17th century the important French manufactories such as Nevers, Rouen, Marseille or Moustiers found their very own style with floral decorations, delicate tendrils, naturalistic pictures or landscape paintings.

DELFT FAIENCE 

But it was not only in the south of Europe that faience production was booming; in the 17th century there were also a large number of manufactories in Germany and Holland. Patterns and motifs from both countries influenced each other time and again. The Dutch workshops were closely oriented towards the Chinese model. The famous Delft faiences are mainly tiles and tableware with motifs in the blue and white Wanli style.Rich Dutch shipowners in particular - the Netherlands was one of the most important seafaring and trading nations at the time - had an influence on the motifs of these ceramics, both as buyers and as sellers. 

CERAMIC ART IN GERMANY 

At that time, there were about 80 faience manufactories in Germany, most of them small craft enterprises. In addition to Germany's oldest faience manufactory in Hanau, where high-quality faience was produced from 1661 to 1806, the manufactories in Ansbach (1709), Nuremberg (1712), Bayreuth (1714), Erfurt (1716) or Wrisbergholzen in the district of Hildesheim (1736) as well as Brunswick, where two manufactories produced faience and utility ceramics between 1707 and 1807, are worth mentioning. The faience collection at Favorite Palace in Rastatt still makes the hearts of ceramics fans beat faster today. The highlight of the collection are the so-called show dishes from the faience manufactory Compagnie Strasbourg-Haguenau. The spectacular objects from the 18th century show tureens in the shape of animals or vegetables; you can see wild birds, wedge heads and turtles, which could be removed from bowls like a kind of lid and filled with food. Another important address for those interested in faience is the Ludwig Collection in Bamberg, which focuses on Strasbourg faience and Meissen porcelain. Among the spectacular exhibits is a very rare tureen in the shape of a turkey, which impresses with its size and lifelike painting alone. Speaking of which, naturalis - tic and detailed vegetable, fruit or animal faiences have long been more of a sideshow at auctions, but have recently become increasingly sought after.A great increase in value is likely with such, mostly rare objects - so there are many reasons to buy one of the enchanting faiences at the NEUMEISTER Autumn Auction.

FAIENCES - 2 COLLECTIONS

- Weithalskrug

auction 402, Lot 1

estimate € 180 to € 250
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 2

estimate € 200 to € 250
still available

- Zwei Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 3

estimate € 200 to € 300
still available

- Zwei Birnkrüge

auction 402, Lot 4

estimate € 200 to € 300
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 5

estimate € 500 to € 600
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 6

estimate € 400 to € 500
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 7

estimate € 400 to € 500
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 8

estimate € 500 to € 600
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 9

estimate € 350 to € 400
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 10

estimate € 250 to € 350
still available

- Zwei Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 11

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 12

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Zwei Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 13

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Zwei Pilasterkrüge

auction 402, Lot 14

estimate € 400 to € 500
still available

- Zwei Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 15

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Zwei Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 16

estimate € 350 to € 450
still available

- Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 17

estimate € 200 to € 300
still available

- Birnkrug und Walzenkrug

auction 402, Lot 18

estimate € 200 to € 300
still available

- Fünf Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 19

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Fünf Walzenkrüge

auction 402, Lot 20

estimate € 250 to € 350
still available

- Drei Teller

auction 402, Lot 21 A

estimate € 150 to € 200
still available

- Vase

auction 402, Lot 21

estimate € 200 to € 250
still available

- Fächerplatte

auction 402, Lot 22

estimate € 450 to € 550
still available

- Große Platte

auction 402, Lot 23

estimate € 400 to € 500
still available

- Schale

auction 402, Lot 24

estimate € 100 to € 150
still available

- Zwei Teller

auction 402, Lot 25

estimate € 120 to € 150
still available

- Wandweihwasserkessel

auction 402, Lot 26

estimate € 250 to € 300
still available

- Platte

auction 402, Lot 27

estimate € 400 to € 450
still available

- Platte

auction 402, Lot 28

estimate € 350 to € 450
still available

- Schale und vier Teller

auction 402, Lot 29

estimate € 250 to € 300
still available

- Ovale Schale und fünf Teller

auction 402, Lot 30

estimate € 400 to € 500
still available

- Steckvase ( Pique Fleurs) in Kommodenform

auction 402, Lot 31

estimate € 300 to € 350
still available

- Ovale Schale

auction 402, Lot 32

estimate € 400 to € 450
still available

- Ovale Schale

auction 402, Lot 33

estimate € 400 to € 450
still available

- Tablett

auction 402, Lot 34

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Platte, zwei Fächerteller und drei Teller mit Korbrand

auction 402, Lot 35

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Tablett

auction 402, Lot 36

estimate € 350 to € 400
still available

- Terrine, runde Platte und Teller

auction 402, Lot 37

estimate € 350 to € 400
still available

- Zwei Platten und Teller

auction 402, Lot 38

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Fächerplatte

auction 402, Lot 39

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Platte

auction 402, Lot 40

estimate € 150 to € 250
still available

- Platte

auction 402, Lot 41

estimate € 200 to € 250
still available

- Platte

auction 402, Lot 42

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Schüssel, Platte und drei Teller

auction 402, Lot 43

estimate € 300 to € 400
still available

- Sieben Teller

auction 402, Lot 44

estimate € 250 to € 300
still available

- Sechs Teller

auction 402, Lot 45

estimate € 250 to € 300
still available

- Sieben Teller

auction 402, Lot 46

estimate € 250 to € 300
still available

- Kaffeekanne

auction 402, Lot 47

estimate € 9.000 to € 10.000
still available

- Kaffeekanne

auction 402, Lot 48

estimate € 7.800 to € 8.000
still available

- Teekännchen

auction 402, Lot 49

estimate € 3.800 to € 4.000
still available

FINE PORCELAIN - MEISSEN - NYMPHENBURG

- Kaffeekanne

auction 402, Lot 48

estimate € 7.800 to € 8.000
still available

- "Der Tag"

auction 402, Lot 86

estimate € 2.600 to € 3.000
still available

A JUG WITH 400 YEARS OF HISTORY - DRINKING CULTURE: MUGS WITH STYLE

- Abendmahlskanne

auction 402, Lot 66

estimate € 18.000 to € 24.000
still available

- Becher

auction 402, Lot 120

estimate € 4.000 to € 5.000
still available

JEWELLERY AUCTION

Let yourself be inspired by high-carat pieces of jewellery that will be auctioned at NEUMEISTER in September!

We recommend: ESSENTIAL PEARL JEWELLERY, including a historic pearl necklace by Mauboussin.

A brooch from the estate of ELSE MOSHAMMER.

ANTIQUE JEWELLERY -especially earrings- from the Roman Imperial period.

INDIAN WEDDING JEWELLERY from around 1900.

VALUABLE COLLIERS with diamonds and sapphires. A link bracelet with 1296 BRILLIONS.

RINGS with emeralds and diamonds.

And for him: MANCHETTE BUTTONS with harlequin motifs from the 1920s (LOT 362) or even earlier FABERGÈ MANCHETTE BUTTONS made in St. Petersburg with diamond roses and rubies (LOT 355).

A watch by Patek Philippe (LOT 368) must not be missing either, of course.

AUCTION JEWELLERY, 22 SEPTEMBER AT 4 PM

 Viewing Days 16 - 20 September

Mo to Fr from 10 am until 5 pm
Sa and Su from 10 am until 3 pm

CATCH OF THE DAY

- Armband mit Brillanten und Saphiren

auction 402, Lot 300

estimate € 2.800 to € 3.500
still available

- Verwandelbarer Anhänger zur Brosche mit Diamanten im Alt -und Baguetteschliff besetzt

auction 402, Lot 319

estimate € 13.500 to € 16.000
still available

- Brosche mit Smaragd und Diamanten

auction 402, Lot 326

estimate € 24.000 to € 26.000
still available

INVESTMENT TIP

- Unikates Brillanten - Collier

auction 402, Lot 244

estimate € 6.200 to € 7.800
still available

- Entouragering mit einem ovalen Diamant - Brillanten sowie Kleinbrillanten

auction 402, Lot 288

estimate € 19.500 to € 23.000
still available

- Exquisites Brillanten besetztes Gliederarmband

auction 402, Lot 297

estimate € 26.800 to € 30.000
still available

HANDSOME

- Collier und Armband mit Brillanten und Saphiren

auction 402, Lot 187

estimate € 23.000 to € 25.000
still available

- Doppelentouragering mit pinkfarbenem Saphir und Diamanten

auction 402, Lot 225

estimate € 7.200 to € 8.200
still available

- Ring mit Rubin und Saphir sowie Diamanten

auction 402, Lot 226

estimate € 6.500 to € 7.500
still available

- Doppelentourage-Ring mit Smaragd und Brillanten

auction 402, Lot 251

estimate € 5.200 to € 6.200
still available

- Bandring mit einem Saphir und Diamanten

auction 402, Lot 256

estimate € 8.200 to € 10.000
still available

- Doppelentourage-Ring mit einem natürlichen leicht goldgelben Diamanten und Brillanten

auction 402, Lot 284

estimate € 4.800 to € 5.500
still available

- Ring mit Brillanten

auction 402, Lot 285

estimate € 4.800 to € 5.500
still available

- Ring mit Rubin und Diamanten

auction 402, Lot 287

estimate € 4.800 to € 5.500
still available

- Ring mit Südsee-Zuchtperle und Diamanten

auction 402, Lot 290

estimate € 1.200 to € 1.600
still available

- Solitär Brillantring

auction 402, Lot 302

estimate € 6.000 to € 7.000
still available

- Entouragering mit gelbem Saphir und Brillanten

auction 402, Lot 306

estimate € 4.500 to € 5.500
still available

- Ring mit Saphir und Brillanten

auction 402, Lot 329

estimate € 6.500 to € 7.500
still available

CHE BELLO - GOLDSMITH'S ART FROM ITALY

- Collier mit Brillanten

auction 402, Lot 241

estimate € 15.000 to € 18.000
still available

- Südsee-Zuchtperlenkette mit brillantenbesetzter Kugelschließe

auction 402, Lot 313

estimate € 11.000 to € 13.000
still available

HIGH FIVE

- Unikater Solitärring mit einem Diamanten im Fancy Deep Greenish Orangy Yellow

auction 402, Lot 196

estimate € 5.500 to € 6.500
still available

- Historischer Entouragering mit einem Rubin im natürlichen "Rouge" sowie Diamanten im Altschliff

auction 402, Lot 224

estimate € 13.000 to € 15.000
still available

- Klassischer Alliancering mit einem feinen kolumbianischen Smaragd und Diamanten im Assher Cut

auction 402, Lot 232

estimate € 13.700 to € 16.000
still available

- Indischer Hochzeitsring mit einem old Mine Smaragd und Email

auction 402, Lot 248

estimate € 5.000 to € 6.000
still available

- Indischer Mantelring mit einem floral gravierten burmesischen Saphir

auction 402, Lot 249

estimate € 13.000 to € 15.000
still available

- Verwandelbarer Entouragering verziert mit einem Fancy Deep Orangy Brown Brillanten sowie weißen Kleinbrillanten, mit zwei Memoryringen kombinierbar

auction 402, Lot 253

estimate € 7.500 to € 9.000
still available

- Armband mit verschiedenfarbigen Saphiren

auction 402, Lot 266

estimate € 26.000 to € 28.000
still available

- Art Dèco Ring verziert mit einem Diamat - Brillanten, Saphiren und Bergkristall

auction 402, Lot 301

estimate € 3.200 to € 3.800
still available

THE PERFECT PEARL
Grace Kelly and Princess Diana loved to wear pearl necklaces, but the iconic image of Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly in "Breakfast at Tiffany's" is most memorable. The multi-strand pearl necklace with the little black dress became a signature look in Hollywood.

Pearls write history, above all "La Peregrina", one of the most famous pearls in the world. The fascinating story begins in the middle of the 16th century. The pearl, the size of a quail's egg, was found by a pearl diver in the Gulf of Panama. It then passed into the hands of various rulers, including Mary I of England ("Bloody Mary") and the Bonapartes. In 1969, Richard Burton bought the treasure to give it to Elisabeth Taylor for Valentine's Day. After the actress's death, "La Peregrina" finally changed hands in March 2011 for 11.8 million US dollars. And it gets even better: The "Pearl of Allah" is considered the largest and most expensive pearl; a diver discovered it on 7 May 1934 off the Philippine island of Palawan. Weight: 6.37 kilograms. 

Pearls are the oldest means of payment in the world and have been highly valued for thousands of years. Greeks and Romans coveted them and sang their praises. Moreover, pearls have been loaded with meaning over the ages, held up as a symbol of virginity, wealth, luck and tears. Problem: At first, it was not so easy to get hold of the things that lay dormant in oysters at the bottom of the sea. So daredevil divers were sent in. Without any technical aids, they roped down in loincloths to a depth of up to 30 metres to cut the oyster from the bottom with a knife. A life-threatening job that had to be done as quickly as possible by those who could hold their breath. Pearl fishing has a long tradition on the "pirate coast" of the Persian Gulf. People were already diving for pearls off the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula more than 7,000 years ago. They also fished for natural pearls in the waters of Ceylon and Japan. In Japan, this delicate business was usually left to women, where there are still about 2,000 "ama" today who dive for shells wearing consecrated headscarves. Everything changed with the invention of pearl farming. In 1888, the Japanese Kokichi Mikimoto opened his first pearl farm. On 11 July 1893, he succeeded in cultivating the first pearl. But it was to take more than ten years before he was able to produce perfectly round (Akoya) cultured pearls. And with that, a new era began - also for the use of pearls in jewellery making.

BY BEATE KALISCH, NEUMEISTER EXPERT FOR JEWELLERY 18TH TO 20TH CENTURY, DIAMONDS, GEMSTONES AND PEARLS

The highlight of the autumn auction is a South Sea cultured pearl necklace made in the USA in 2007. The remarkable diameter of the pearls is approx. 13-16.8 millimetres (lot 313). A real rarity is the natural pearl necklace with a lock decorated by diamond roses, created for Mauboussin over 100 years ago. 112 natural saltwater pearls and 32 tiny diamond roses were used. The original shaped case in light grey-blue silk is part of this exceptional lot (lot 245).

 

CULTURED PEARLS

 

FROM THE SEAFROM LAKE AND RIVER

AKOYA PEARLS
The small pearl that traditionally comes from the Sea of Japan is for many still the epitome of the perfect cultured pearl. cultured pearl. It is naturally white or cream-coloured, but through breeding it is also available in many other colours. available.

SOUTH SEA PEARLS
They are shimmering white, silver or golden and are particularly They are particularly large and can reach a diameter of up to 20 millimetres. They are native to the warm waters of Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

TAHITI PEARLS
The dark cultured pearls grow off the coasts of Tahiti and other islands of French Polynesia. In colour nuances from anthracite to silver-grey, with shimmering shimmering aubergine or green tones, they differ from the classic light from the classic light-coloured pearls.

FRESHWATER PEARLS
They have been cultivated in China for centuries in lakes and rivers. In contrast to sea water pearls, they usually do not have a natural core. natural core. They are not always completely round, They can also be oval or drop-shaped.



- Edle Naturperlenkette mit einem Diamantrosen verzierten Zierschloss

auction 402, Lot 245

estimate € 4.000 to € 5.500
still available

- Südsee-Zuchtperlenkette mit brillantenbesetzter Kugelschließe

auction 402, Lot 313

estimate € 11.000 to € 13.000
still available

- Anhänger "Salamander mit Schmetterling" verziert mit Perlen, Brillanten und rubinen

auction 402, Lot 321

estimate € 2.000 to € 2.800
still available

PENDANTS FROM THE ANTIQUE

Troy, 31 May 1873: Heinrich Schliemann comes across a copper plate at the foot of a fortress wall that has just been excavated. Something shimmers behind it: a bottle of pure gold becomes visible. What comes to light afterwards exceeds the wildest expectations: 2 diadems, 6 bracelets, 60 gold earrings and 8,000 gold finger rings. Schliemann speaks euphorically of the "treasure of Priam", but today we know that the jewellery was made about 1,000 years before the fall of Troy. No matter: the find is a sensation and makes the amateur archaeologist Schliemann, who had been ridiculed until then, famous in one fell swoop.

And at the latest since the photo of his young wife Sophia with the Troy gold jewellery went around the world, antique jewellery has been on everyone's lips. While the jewels from Asia Minor disappeared after the war as "looted art" in the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, the jewellery art of another lost people became increasingly known. Fuelled by sensational excavation finds and exhibitions, it became apparent that the Etruscans were THE jewellery artists of antiquity. Their innovations, especially in earrings, are considered groundbreaking. Here they adopted the simple hoop shape from other cultures, but now decorated them with the finest granulation and provided them with pendants. In addition, there were regular right-hand ornamental plates made of wafer-thin, chased gold sheet. Around 250 BC, the Etruscan culture was literally absorbed by the expanding Roman Empire. The Romans, who appreciated the talent of the Etruscan goldsmiths, soon had them working for them. The collection offered by NEUMEISTER in September shows how well this worked out. The bulk of the collection dates from the Roman Imperial period (1st - 3rd century AD) and also includes a few post-ancient pieces. The majority are antique earrings, including examples in the tradition of Etruscan hoop earrings, but also shield earrings in a new "Roman" form.

BY SABINE VON POSCHINGER,
NEUMEISTER -EXPERT IN JEWELLERY

- Collier, Anhänger, sechs Paar Ohrringe und sechs einzelne Ohrringe

auction 402, Lot 180

estimate € 2.200 to € 2.800
still available

- Zehn Paar Ohrringe und zehn einzelne Ohrringe

auction 402, Lot 205

estimate € 2.700 to € 3.500
still available

- Elf Paar Ohrringe und drei Haarnadeln

auction 402, Lot 233

estimate € 3.200 to € 3.800
still available