NEUMESITER MAGAZINE APRIL 2021
Editorial by Katrin Stoll

Dear friends of NEUMEISTER, dear friends of art,

when we had to postpone our March auctions a good year ago due to the first lockdown - first to April, then at the beginning of May - I very optimistically quoted Max Frisch: "A crisis is a productive state. You just have to take away the taint of catastrophe from it." Well, from a retrospective point of view, I would almost say: 

We, the entrepreneurs, did what we always do: We bear responsibility for our employees, our customers and society, roll up our sleeves and make the best of traditionally fast-changing requirements, market situations and competitive conditions. We have adapted quickly and unbureaucratically to the requirements and hygiene concepts, and have invested. As human beings, we cared for our fellow human beings, children, families. Many mothers, especially single parents, faced almost inhuman challenges. 

When the restrictions were loosened in early May 2020, they wanted to continue to take away our business, counted the auction trade as part of "sales parties." I think you know all too well how little the auction trade in general and NEUMEISTER have in common with party. With the assistance of my silent partner, the respected lawyer Prof. Dr. Wolf-Rüdiger Bub, we drafted a complaint to the Bavarian Administrative Court and an application for a temporary injunction (§ 47 para. 6 VwGO). This changed the mind of the state capital of Munich, or rather the district administration department as our highest supervisory authority, and they decided to allow us after all, after several months, to "be open to the public" for our business model. At the same time, this paved the way for all our colleagues in the auction trade to be allowed to auction in front of a room audience again. 

I think the German SME sector cut a very good figure in the fateful year 2020. Culture, artists, retail - which includes auction houses - gastronomy and the hotel industry were and still are facing enormous challenges, both in economic and human terms. We show solidarity, but conversely we also wish for more solidarity. 

The pandemic temporarily put the brakes on the auction trade, but also gave it a tailwind, promoting in particular the trend towards digitalization. In the Corona year 2020, for example, we had bidders from over 60 nations. And younger people in particular discovered how exciting and profitable bidding on the computer can be. At the December auction and the special auction "Art in Exile," which attracted a great deal of public attention, there were digital bidding wars that led to top results.

Online catalog, social media, bidding by mouse click: We have positioned ourselves in the digital world. However, NEUMEISTER is clearly committed to the tradition of the multi-sector house. The April auctions, in which two important art collections and a broad portfolio of art objects from different sectors for every taste and wallet are auctioned, are the best example of this. Why should analog and digital auction trading also be at odds? NEUMEISTER has successfully proven that exactly the opposite is the case for more than ten years, thanks to its forward-looking hybrid strategy.

AUCTION MODERN, POST WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART

INTENSIVE. INSPIRING. INNOVATIVE. YOU APPRECIATE CLASSIC MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART? THEN YOU WILL BE INSPIRED ON THE NEXT PAGES BY SELECTED WORKS THAT WILL BE CALLED AT THE NEUMEISTER AUCTION IN APRIL. HIGHLIGHTS OF CLASSICAL MODERN ART ARE A MEDITATION BY ALEXEJ VON JAWLENSKY, AN ITALIAN LONGING PAINTING BY KONSTANTIN GORBATOV AND A LANDSCAPE PAINTING BY LESSER URY. IN THE FIELD OF CONTEMPORARY ART, WHICH HAS NEVER BEEN MORE POPULAR THAN TODAY, WE ARE PLEASED TO OFFER TWO FIRST-CLASS WORKS BY ARNULF RAINER. THE CONTEMPORARY AUCTION PORTFOLIO IS ROUNDED OFF BY A NUMBER OF SIGNIFICANT WORKS OF ART FOR SMALLER BUDGETS. 

 

 

Auction on April 15, 5 p.m.

Viewing Days from 8 until 12 April
Mo to Fr from 10 am until 5 pm
Sa and Su from 10 am until 3 pm

HIGHLIGHTS DER MODERNE

FRIEDENSREICH HUNDERTWASSER

OPPONENT OF THE STRAIGHT LINE

Friedensreich Hundertwasser (1928 - 2000) was an opponent of the straight line, a credo that manifests itself above all in his colourful and lively buildings. The Austrian artist called his painting with intensely bright colours and the spiral as a distinguishing feature "vegetative". Typical of Hundertwasser's richness of colour are also the ten graphic works which will be auctioned by NEUMEISTER in April. Hundertwasser's graphic oeuvre, by the way, is manageable. He experimented with different, sometimes complicated and effective printing techniques. Examples of Hundertwasser's artistic versatility are the stamps, medals, bibles, Brockhaus encyclopaedias - and watches he designed.

PRIVATE COLLECTIONS

CONVOLUTES FOR CONNOISSEURS NEUMEISTER APPRAISES AND AUCTIONS COLLECTIONS AND ESTATES FOR FOR DECADES. AGAIN AND AGAIN ENTRUSTED WITH LARGE AND IMPORTANT WHICH HAVE ACHIEVED TOP RESULTS AT AUCTION. RECENT EXAMPLES OF THIS ARE THE ESTATE OF THE COMPANY'S FOUNDER RUDOLF NEUMEISTER, WHICH WILL BE AUCTIONED IN OCTOBER 2019 RUDOLF NEUMEISTER AND, AS RECENTLY AS MARCH 2021 THE SENSATIONAL SPECIAL AUCTION "ART IN EXILE". NOW NEUMEISTER IS AUCTIONING NEUMEISTER AUCTIONS ART OBJECTS FROM THE ESTATE ART OBJECTS FROM THE ESTATE FROM THE ESTATE OF AN IMPORTANT MUNICH ART COLLECTOR AND ANOTHER, SMALLER COLLECTION FROM THE AMMERSEE REGION. WE ARE THUS ARE COMMITTED TO OUR TRADITION AS A AUCTION HOUSE WITH A BROAD SELECTION OF ART SELECTION OF ART OBJECTS.

 

VOL. 1

PRIVATE COLLECTION MUNICH

THE COLLECTION WILL BE AUCTIONED OFF AS A SEPARATE LOT AT THE AUCTION ON APRIL 14

VOL. 2

COLLECTION MÜHLFELD CASTLE

OBJECTS OF THE COLLECTION WILL BE AUCTIONED IN THE AUCTIONS ON APRIL 14 AND 15

 

Here I watch (over the art). Pug, lovingly arranged, like the paintings on the wall.

Statement: Here by a magnificent and technically masterfully executed writing cabinet (around 1750), there by miniatures and graphics that the photographer has carefully embedded in the scenery.

 

 

Aesthetics are everything: Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI in the most beautiful splendour.

Recognising the signs of the times. Table clock, Vienna, 19th century meets video screen, Munich, 21st century.

This St. Peter holding the book to himself was created around 1500.

The virtuoso boxwood relief from the first half of the 17th century
tells of the victory of love over sin.

ABOUT COLLECTING

ONLINECATALOGUE
COLLECTIONS

POSTCARDS, BOOKS, COMICS, FOSSILS, CORKS, VINTAGE CARS, RECORDS, SURPRISE EGGS: PEOPLE LIKE TO COLLECT EVERYTHING. AND IF - AS IN THE CASE OF THE MUNICH COLLECTOR WHOSE ESTATE IS NOW BEING AUCTIONED BY NEUMEISTER - THE PASSION IS FOR HIGH-RANKING WORKS OF ART, AN AUCTION HOUSE OFTEN COMES INTO PLAY IN THE END.

 

 

Building one's own collection gives inner joy, contributes to self-realisation, awakens hunting instincts and makes one happy. Hope of financial gain, tax advantages, social prestige - these may all be motives for collecting, but above all it is about passion. And what is finally acquired from the deepest inner drive, one does not give away again so quickly. It's not just about the material value; no, there is an inner bond that holds collector and object together. Anyone who buys a Spitzweg at auction, for example, will feel close to the painter and his world view captured on canvas. Anyone who collects 200-year-old porcelain from Meissen will be receptive to the spirit with which these fragile precious objects are charged in terms of content. And anyone who then heaves a 250-year-old precious wood cabinet into the living room will be thrilled by its timeless beauty and masterly craftsmanship. Vita brevis, ars longa. What happens to the objects if the collector should die and his descendants no longer wish to continue the work because they lack an inner connection to the objects or subsequent generations simply have a different taste? Then what has been collected over a lifetime is sold, usually by professionals at auction. Of course, the existing collection is torn apart by the sale, but any aftertaste evaporates when one witnesses at an auction how someone beams with happiness after a successful bidding war, because the acquisition of just this single piece that has been sought for so long completes the collection after what feels like an eternity of patient waiting. 

Before a collection is put up for auction, it is evaluated by our art historians. For this purpose, NEUMEISTER experts also examined the estate in the former villa of the Munich collector and the accompanying photographer took the opportunity to photograph the art in situ, i.e. in its original position. The resulting photo reportage can be seen on the previous and following pages. The works of art tell of the collector's preferences and his pleasure in beautiful things. Gothic sculptures, a small relief from the 17th century and high-quality furniture can be seen. The walls are adorned with a painting by Carl Spitzweg, two works by Franz Christoph Janneck, merry revelers and gallant miniatures. The top-class porcelain collection is lovingly arranged in illuminated display cases. Coffee pots, cups, plates, cherubs, groups of shepherds and tailors riding on billy goats - the range of precious objects from Meissen, Ludwigsburg and Frankenthal is wide-ranging and, like everything else, is now waiting to light up the eyes of other collectors (al). 

A cool beer, a hearty snack. That's all it takes. Let us sink into our wing chairs and think about the beautiful, simple things in life.

 

 

Fragile society. The precious porcelain objects are among the highlights of the collection.

 

 

Light shows. Since around 1490, the child on the arm of the Central German Madonna of the Crescent Moon has been giving his blessing. 

 

 

"THE REAL COLLECTOR IS NOT RECOGNISED BY WHAT HE HAS, BUT BY WHAT HE WOULD BE HAPPY TO HAVE." MARC CHAGALL

"COLLECTORS ARE HAPPY PEOPLE." JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE

"IN MANY A PICTURE COLLECTION, THE OWNER IS THE ONLY ORIGINAL." CLAUDE VILLIERS [COLLECT]

"TO GATHER TOGETHER THINGS IN WHICH ONE IS INTERESTED IN ORDER TO KEEP THEM (BECAUSE OF THEIR VALUE IN LARGER NUMBERS, BECAUSE OF THEIR BEAUTY, OR THE LIKE) [IN A CERTAIN ORDER]." DUDEN

"COLLECTING - MORBID TENDENCY TO ACCUMULATE OBJECTS WITHOUT PRACTICAL NEED." BROCKHAUS LEXICON 1965

AUCTION WORKS ON PAPER AND PAINTINGS 15. - 20. CENTURY

PAINTING FROM BREUGHEL TO BÜRKEL
JAN BREUGHEL D J. (1601 -1678), ATTRIBUTED PARADISE LANDSCAPE. JOHANNES LINGELBACH (1622-1674) SEA BATTLE. ANTONIO CARNICERO (1748-1814), ATTRIBUTED BOY WITH CANARY. KARL THEODOR VON PILOTY (1826-1886) ROMAN SENATOR. GERMAN (?), MID 19TH C. YOUNG LADY. KARL WILHELM DIEFENBACH (1851-1913) RICHARD WAGNER. HEINRICH BÜRKEL (1802-1869) ZUGSPITZE. EDUARD SCHLEICH THE E. (1812-1874) LAKE STARNBERG. MAX VON MENZ (1824-1895) CINDERELLA. CANTIUS DILLIS (1779-1854) HILLY LANDSCAPE. WILHELM VON KAULBACH (1804-1874) FRANZ VON LÖHER EUGEN NAPOLEON NEUREUTHER, ATTRIBUTED (1806-1882) "GERMANY'S SOUTH AND NORTH".

 

 

Auction on April 15, 2 p.m.

Viewing Days from 8 until 12 April

Mo to Fr from 10 am until 5 pm
Sa and Su from 10 am until 3 pm

AUCTION FINE ART AND ANTIQUES

BEAUTIFUL THINGS CAN BE SO BEAUTIFUL HANDICRAFT!

VALUABLE HUMMOCKS AND GOBLETS, HISTORIC CLOCKS, CHUBBY-CHEEKED PUTTI, EXPRESSIVE BAROQUE SCULPTURES, CHANDELIERS MADE OF OLD SILVER, FINE PORCELAIN AND COVETED OBJECTS BY ITALIAN AND JAPANESE STAR DESIGNERS. NEUMEISTER CALLS FOR EXTRA CLASS ARTS AND CRAFTS AT THE SPRING AUCTION.

 

 

Auction on April 14, 2 p.m.

Viewing Days from 8 until 12 April

Mo to Fr from 10 am until 5 pm
Sa and Su from 10 am until 3 pm

TRIUMPH OF LOVE OVER SIN
SINFALL
BOXWOOD RELIEF
SOUTHERN GERMANY, 1ST HALF 17TH C.
36,5 × 24,5 cm
AUCTION 400 // LOT 51
ESTIMATED PRICE € 8.000-12.000
RESULT:€ 27.940 (incl. 27 % Buyer´s Premium)

Adam and Eve, the tree of knowledge and the serpent - the story of the biblical progenitors is over 2000 years old and the myth of the Incarnation par excellence. The depiction of the Fall of Man is found in art from the late 2nd century AD. Here, the now universally known type - Adam and Eve positioned at the side of the Tree of Knowledge with a serpent - is coined and maintained into the early modern era. One of the most famous and influential illustrations was created by Albrecht Dürer in his masterful copperplate engraving dated 1504, in which he constructed the two nudes according to antique theories of proportion and integrated numerous allegorical motifs from flora and fauna. 
Dürer's Fall of Man was readily taken up by artists of the 16th and 17th centuries and translated into the medium of sculpture. Particularly in small sculpture, one can find fully sculptural groups or reliefs of this theme. Often masterfully executed in terms of carving technique, such works of art were frequently collection pieces in early Baroque chambers of art and curiosities. 
If we compare Dürer's copper engraving with the boxwood relief (see right) from the first half of the 17th century that is to be auctioned at the NEUMEISTER spring auction, we can see that the relief is a work of art from the early Baroque period. If we compare this particularly high-quality work, which depicts anatomy and vege - tation in a detailed and finely structured manner, parallels become apparent at first glance: the tree of knowledge as the center of the composition, Adam's figure and posture, Eve with the strands of curls fluttering to the side and the apple in her left hand, the ox lying at her feet as a medieval symbol for the temperament of the phlegmatic man. At the same time, however, it becomes clear that Adam and Eve stand here in a completely different relationship to each other: While in Dürer's work the two do not make eye contact and thus maintain a certain distance, in our relief they are intimately turned toward each other. In this pair of lovers, the theme of temptation in the form of the serpent coiled around the tree is literally relegated to the background: love seems to assert itself here in the face of sin.

SALUTI DA MILANO

FURNITURE AND FASHION, CARS AND ARCHITECTURE: ITALIAN DESIGN SETS TRENDS WORLDWIDE. WHY? "QUITE SIMPLY, WE ARE THE BEST," WAS THE CATCHY ANSWER GIVEN BY ARCHITECT AND DESIGNER LUIGI CACCIA DOMINIONI (1913 - 2016). THE OBJECTS THAT WILL BE AUCTIONED BY NEUMEISTER IN APRIL SHOW THAT HE WAS NOT ENTIRELY WRONG.

 

 

CAT "GATTO AVVOCACCIATO FIORATO"
PIERO FORNASETTI
AUCTION 400 // LOT 188
ESTIMATE € 1.000-1.200
RESULT: € 1.270 (inkl. 27 % Buyer´s Premium)
TRAY "FIORI
PIERO FORNASETTI
AUCTION 400 // LOT 210
ESTIMATE € 600-800

PIERO FORNASETTI: ART AS PART OF LIFE

Painting, graphics, sculpture, object design, interior design, letterpress printing, stage design: Piero Fornasetti (1913-1988) was what today is called an all-rounder. The Italian is said to have produced more than 11,000 art objects during his lifetime. His trademark: the face of the Italian opera singer Lina Cavalieri, which Fornasetti discovered in 1952, many years after her death, and from then on became an obsession. In countless variations, he gave the once celebrated diva, who was considered the most beautiful woman in the world around 1900, a new, surreal shape again and again on wall plates in the series "Tema e Variazioni" (Theme and Variations). Art as an integral part of everyday life - this was the credo of the manufactory that Fornasetti founded after World War II together with Gio Ponti (1891-1979), the famous designer (Superleggera chair) and architect (Milan's Pirelli skyscraper). Fornasseti became the brand to which we owe a number of beautiful things, including the two objects that will be called in April at NEUMEISTER.

SHOWCASE
ALDO TURA
232 × 250 × 58 cm
AUCTION 400 // LOT 226
ESTIMAT € 7.000-9.000

ALDO TURA: PREFERENCE FOR COMPLEX SHAPES

Exemplary of Italian stylistic diversity is a large display cabinet (see p. 121) by the experimental Milanese furniture designer Aldo Tura (1909-1963). The wooden body of this piece of furniture was covered with goatskin, painted blue-grey and varnished, creating a unique effect. In the spirit of Aldo Tura, who liked complex shapes, extravagant colors, used unusual materials and combined Art Deco, Art Nouveau and minimalism in his designs. And always the pieces of furniture produced in Aldo Turas' workshop in small numbers or as prototypes are of exceptional quality of craftsmanship. 

THE HANDWRITING OF GIO PONTI

Back to Gio Ponti. The two half-cabinets (see p. 120), which will also be auctioned in April, bear his handwriting. They are painted with decorative scenes - probably from antiquity. Stylish, a little exotic and real eye-catcher

TWO HALF CUPBOARDS
ITALY, 1930S
(IN THE STYLE OF GIO PONTI)
92 × 100 × 54 cm
AUCTION 400 // LOT 224
ESTIMATED PRICE € 1.500-1.800 (TOGETHER)
RESULT:€ 6.985 (incl. 27 % Buyer´s Premium)
HOW HIGH TO THE MOON!

How high the Moon, the jazz classic by Duke Ellington, lent its name to the wire chair that Japanese interior architect and designer Shirō Kuramata created for Vitra in 1982. The surface of the nickel-plated metal mesh shimmers like moonlight. The intricately constructed seating object fascinates with the contrast of its opulent, bourgeois form in the style of a sprawling salon chair and cool, simple materials. And, yes, you can sit on it! It's not really comfortable, but all those who are on their toes in the bidding competition at the April auction will have the chance to acquire a real object of art. This also applies to Shirō Kuramata's Sing-Sing Chair, a cool armchair made of metal mesh and silver-gray painted tubular steel.

 

 

HOW HIGH THE MOON
DESIGN SHIRŌ KURAMATA
1982
steel nickel plated
AUCTION 400 // LOT 227
ESTIMATE € 5.000-7.000
RESULT: € 5.080 (inkl. 27 % Buyer´s Premium)
SING SING CHAIR
DESIGN SHIRŌ KURAMATA
1982
steel nickel plated
AUCTION 400 // LOT 228
ESTIMATE € 1.200-1.500
JEWELLERY AUCTION

AUCTION JEWELLERY
 
 

Auction on April 14, 5 p.m.


Viewing Days from 8 until 12 April
Mo to Fr from 10 am until 5 pm
Sa and Su from 10 am until 3 pm

Blue wonder.

This necklace with brightly shining topazes was handmade on the occasion of a wedding, as a gift for the bride, who wore it only on her wedding day. A fitting choice, as both the topaz and the color light blue symbolize fidelity, harmony and permanence.

FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS

Rose, placed in chains. 

This sautoir brilliant-cut diamond necklace - as seen with the rose - can be placed around the neck several times. In the Art Deco period, these precious stones were in great demand and were offered in platinum with diamonds as well as with sapphires, rubies and emeralds in all lengths.

Flower Power.

Bow to such great artistry of nature and the Jewelry Designer: Pendant necklace set with emerald, the epitome of epitome of green colored gemstones. Coat ring with a natural red "Old Mine" spinel from Burma.

Paris, 1935. 

Historical brooch clip with diamonds and rubies by Boivin. 

René Boivin (1864-1917) lived and worked in Paris. An excellent designer and engraver, he began a career in jewelry at a young age. In the 1890s, he bought several workshops and settled in Rue St. Anastase. In 1893 he married Jeanne Poiret, and together they created some of the boldest and most daring jewelry fashions of the early 20th century. After Boivin's untimely death, his wife and daughter successfully continued the business with other designers for over 40 years.

DARE!

Blue is the color of feeling. And as contradictory as our feelings themselves. Light blue stands for lightness and harmony. Dark blue appears melancholic, but is also romantic and noble.

Two necklaces that NEUMEISTER is offering at the spring auction, one with sky-blue topazes, the other with azure sapphires, move in the field of tension of the color spectrum. 

Spring is here, so let's focus on topaz first. It has an extraordinary variety of colors, from colorless to yellow, brown, green, red, purple and blue. The blue topaz, which is very rare in nature, is especially sought after. Colorless topaz resembles diamonds - confusion is not impossible. The most prominent example of this is the Braganza diamond (1680 carats), which is in the Portuguese crown and was long thought to be a diamond, but is actually a clear topaz. And there is another similarity with diamonds, because topaz gemstones are pleochroic, so they show different colors depending on the viewing angle: a flickering effect that gives the topaz inner fire, like a diamond. Usually, the topaz is of a lighter color, like the stones in the necklace now up for auction at NEUMEISTER. 

Jewelry with blue gemstones is the perfect wedding gift. And if you want to really score points with your beloved, it's best to go for azure sapphires, which also adorn the vintage necklace (see right) that is also being auctioned by NEUMEISTER. The romantic blue of the stones stands for loyalty and says in a very charming and appreciative way: Forget-me-not.

Legends have grown up around precious stones. One is about the Schneckenstein in Saxony. Mermaids are said to have been transformed into wine-yellow topazes by a ghost on the 23-meter-high rock. The fact is that Augustus the Strong (1670-1733), who loved topaz, had it mined at Schneckenstein for jewelry. Today, cut specimens can be admired in the Green Vault in Dresden. 
Sabine von Poschinger, expert for jewelry 19th to 20th century, jewels

 

 

Cheers!

Cocktail necklace with brilliant and octagonal cut diamonds. 

USA, 1960s.

 

Still looking for a diamond to match the drink
Whoever wins the bid for one of these works of art, which are also significant in terms of contemporary history, will use it to attract attention at the next cocktail party.

Matching drink: Mojito 

5 cl white rum 

2,5 cl lime juice 

2 cl sugar syrup 

6 to 8 mint leaves (fresh) 

Soda water to top up (around 4 cl)

Matching drink: White Russian 
Known from the cult movie "The Big Lebowski".

3 cl vodka

3 cl Kahlua

4 cl milk

1 cl cream

EVERYBODY TAKE A LOOK!

Cocktail jewelry is eye-catching, a bit provocative and always provides something to talk about.

Shiny  small talk is  guaranteed above all by extravagant rings. 

If you're going to break the law, then please do it in style!

Let's set our story somewhere in a backroom bar in New York. One evening in the Golden Twenties, a time of economic prosperity in the USA, but also of gangsterism and pleasure-seeking. 

And Prohibition, during which you could only drink the forbidden alcohol in secret - which you did. We see a wealthy young woman. With a defiant look under her bob, she is getting ready for the illegal cocktail party. She wants to really let it rip, to attract attention. So she wraps herself in a seductive flapper-look dress, throws on a feather boa, packs an endlessly long cigarette holder into her elegant clutch - and places a ring on her finger. Not a coy princess-cut gem, but a shameless piece with a huge, decadently sparkling gemstone. Look, a cocktail ring! Cocktail jewelry is eye-catching, a bit provocative, and always provides something to talk about. Shiny small talk is guaranteed above all by extravagant rings. An eye-catcher at any party. [26] This gem captivates with its fine natural pink sapphire and elegant appearance in the cocktail style of the 1960s and 1970s.

Matching drink: Pink Lady 4 cl gin 1 tsp lemon juice 1 dash grenadine syrup 1 whole egg white 1 BL powdered sugar 1 maraschino cherry 3 ice cubes

With the whisper parties of the Prohibition era (1920-1933), the cocktail ring comes into fashion. A pompous piece of jewelry, inherent in the spirit of rebellion. Striking, big and loud. A statement, also socially, because cocktail rings and related accessories have a clear message: everybody look! I am wealthy, live self-determined and like to be the center of attention. 

After World War II, the cocktail party tradition, now legal, continued in the U.S. and became a social ritual in living rooms. How lively such after-work get-togethers could be was shown in enjoyable Hollywood films of the 1950s and 1960s. After a time lag, the trend also spread to Germany in the wake of the economic miracle. In contrast to the USA, where people liked to wear extravagant cocktail jewelry on such occasions, in this country things were more discreet and elegant jewelry was the order of the day. Here as there, the cocktail ring was sure to attract attention, because at standing parties, the glass is usually held in the hand. And so the ring fulfilled its main purpose: to bring the wearer into conversation and possibly initiate a flirtation. 

Whether a hundred years ago in the twilight of a hidden backyard establishment in New York or today in a hipster bar: a cocktail ring - with which, by the way, men are also allowed to underline their personal style - will not fail to make an impact. Especially opulent vintage bling is the perfect communicative opener, because it has stories to tell. People quickly get closer over a Gimlet or Manhattan and whisper at the bar, for example, about Al Capone and the glories of Prohibition-era bartenders; those masters of ceremonies who always had in mind making moonshine drinkable and masking its idiosyncratic taste with inventive cocktail creations. 

It's crazy. Are we experiencing some kind of flashback to the 1920s? Then as now, bar visits were taboo, albeit for different reasons. But there is not only the longing for boisterous parties, but also the hope that these will be possible again in the near future. Just the anticipation of a time when it will again be possible to whisper and flirt analogously and in the flesh without regrets makes us happy! Let's shorten the wait by picking the coolest location, the perfect outfit, the most original toast, the most elaborate hairstyle - and timelessly beautiful cocktail jewelry, such as will be available at the NEUMEISTER spring auction (kjk)

"To this day, the cocktail ring is an eye-catcher, because its sheer size and dazzling colors alone make it impossible to overlook. As an all-rounder, depending on taste and liquidity set with precious or gemstones, it enhances - gladly in ironic refraction - any outfit, can be worn with jeans and T-shirt or office outfit as well as with the little black dress. 

Beate Kalisch, expert for jewelry 18th to 20th century, diamonds, gemstones and pearls.

 

 

THE LAST PHARAOH AND HIS CUP OF GOLD

GOLD CUP WITH DIAMONDS FROM THE POSSESSION OF KING FARUK I. EGYPT, ALEXANDRIA, 1ST HALF 20TH C.

AUCTION 400 // LOT 329
ESTIMATE € 13.000-15.000

At the age of 16, King Faruk I ascends Egypt's royal throne in 1936. Coddled since childhood, he succeeds his father Fuad I, who founded the Egyptian kingdom in 1922. Faruk I is a rotten regent, gets into the headlines because of mismanagement, corruption and a dissolute lifestyle. On July 23, 1952, the man who considers himself Egypt's last pharaoh is overthrown in a coup by General Muhammad Nagib and Lieutenant Colonel Gamal Abd el-Nasser, the longtime president of the later newly proclaimed republic.

Faruk, now 32 years old, goes into exile in Italy, but does not weep for the lost power. Dolce vita is the order of the day, and he now wants to be a real playboy, like Gunter Sachs or Alfonso Prinz zu Hohenlohe. Photos show that the corpulent ex-monarch likes to play the role of the cosmopolitan bon vivant, even if it usually goes wrong. Faruk spends a fortune on shopping trips, in casinos and on love affairs - and on good food. This was also the case on March 18, 1965, at the posh restaurant "Ile de France" in Rome. There, after a sumptuous dinner and a last cigar, death overtook him at the age of 45. It is said to have been a cerebral stroke or heart attack, and there are also rumors of a poisoned lobster.

Not much in Egypt reminds of the former monarch. The royal property had already been auctioned off in 1954 in Cairo's Koubbeh Palace. Well, there was an elephant turtle that Faruk had donated to the Cairo Zoo, but it died in 2006 at the age of 250. And so art lovers with a soft spot for Egyptian royalty sit up and take notice when things of royal provenance turn up - like the gold cup owned by Faruk, which will be auctioned by NEUMEISTER in April and says a lot about the lifestyle and self-image of its former owner. This is especially true of the stylized papyrus plant set with diamonds on the wall. In ancient Egypt, papyrus was reserved for the pharaoh: Faruk, the last pharaoh.

TIMELESS ELEGANT

The choice of luxury wristwatches for men is complex. The purchase price is determined by the material, movement and exclusivity of the brand. At the upper end of the price scale are the classically elegant, timelessly perfect and extremely simple timepieces from the Geneva luxury watch manufacturer Patek Philippe. The gold watch offered by NEUMEISTER at the April auction (in very good condition, with original wooden box and leather strap) impresses with its clear, uncluttered aesthetics. On the back is a round glass cover, whereby the movement is visible. A timeless eye-catcher in the inimitable Patek Philippe style - and a real investment